Surviving & Thriving Over the Holidays: #MacroSW 12/8 at 9pm EST

holiday-checklist
Image source.

For a variety of reasons, the holidays can be filled with multiple sources of stress. Let’s chat about holiday self-care and bring back some joy to the holiday season!

 

 

Chat Questions:

  1. How is your holiday season going?
  2. What do you wish others knew about your holiday stressors?
  3. What are you grateful for this holiday season?
  4. What are you hopeful for in the coming year?

Chat Resources:

A True History of Social Workers Online: #MacroSW 12/1 at 9 pm EST

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Screenshot of timeline by Susan Mankita and Linda Grobman from http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/technology-articles/true-history-of-social-workers-online/

Guest Experts

lindagrobman
Linda Grobman, MSW, ACSW, LSW

Linda Grobman, MSW, ACSW, LSW, is the publisher, editor, and founder of the award-winning The New Social Worker magazine (www.socialworker.com). Linda has had an interest in connecting with social workers online since the late 1980s, and has published a technology column in The New Social Worker since its beginning in 1994.  She also co-authored The Social Worker’s Internet Handbook with Gary Grant in 1998. Linda was 2014 Social Worker of the Year for PA NASW and was named NASW Social Work Pioneer this year for “…supporting early-career social workers through her innovative publishing endeavors, and embracing technology for social workers—and in the intersection of the two.”

 

susanmankita
Susan Mankita, MSW, LCSW

Susan Mankita, MSW, LCSW has been educating social workers about technology since 1995. She founded the AOL Social Work Forum, one of the earliest and the longest running online communities for social workers. She connected thousands of social workers there, and later, through SocialWorkChat.org. These long running online communities for social workers, enabled easy access to support, mentoring and training FOR colleagues BY colleagues, long before the existence of Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter. She provided the earliest training about the Internet to NASW’s National Board of Directors, and The Association of Social Work Boards before many of them had access to email.  Currently, Susan owns a professional development company for social workers and provides licensure preparation focused on struggling re-takers.  She teaches social work practice courses at FIU. She was the 2013 Social Worker of the Year for both the Miami-Dade Unit and Florida Chapter of NASW.

In April 2016, Susan Mankita and Linda Grobman presented at the 2016 Social Work Distance Education conference on the topic, “A True History of Social Workers Online.”

They presented a timeline, which represents major events and memories in the development of social workers’ use of the Internet beginning in the 1980s. Through this timeline and presentation at the Social Work Distance Education conference in April 2016, in Indianapolis, IN, and now through this Twitter chat, Susan and Linda seek to preserve the rich history of social workers’ use of the Internet, dispel the myth that social workers have not been and are not online, and emphasize the value of the relationships formed through online networking by social workers with social workers.

Please join us for this discussion with two early adopters of online networking for social workers.

Here are questions we will discuss:

  1. So now you’ve heard our early experiences. Fill in some gaps. What’s your earliest experience with social work or social workers online?
  2. Building community and insuring social presence. Here’s how we did it. How has it changed?
  3. You are our legacy. What do you hope your legacy will be? What will social workers be doing online 15-20 years from now?

Seriously Old but Appropriately Selected References:

  • Bellamy, D. (1987). Innovative applications of computer technology in social work. Paper presented at the Conference of the Canadian Association of Schools of Social Work, Learned Societies Meeting, Hamilton, Ontario, June 7.
  • Cnaan, R.A. (1989).  Introduction: Social work practice and information technology – an unestablished link. Computers in Human Services, 5(1/2), 1-15.
  • Colon Y. (1996). Chatter(er)ing through the fingertips: Doing group therapy online. Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory (9), 205-215.
  • Giffords, E. (1998).  Social Work on the Internet:  An Introduction.  Social Work, 43(2), 243 – 251.
  • Grant G.B. & Grobman, L.M. (1998).  The social worker’s internet handbook.  Harrisburg, PA:  White Hat Communications.
  • Marson, S. M. (1998).  Major uses of the internet for social workers: A brief report for new users. Arete, 22(2), 21-28. Retrieved from http://www.marson-and-associates.com/resume/RMajor.pdf
  • Marson, S. M. (2003). A Selective History of Internet Technology and Social Work,” that was published in Computers in Human Services, 14:2, 35 — 49.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J407v14n02_03
  • National Association of Social Workers & Association of Social Work Boards (2005).  Standards for technology and social work practice. Available at http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/standards/NASWTechnologyStandards.pdf
  • Smith, M. (2009). What my LED ball reveals about the future of technology and social work: a farewell aloha. Retrieved from http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/technology-articles/What_My_LED_Ball_Reveals_About_the_Future_of_Technology_and_Social_Work%3A_A_Farewell_Aloha/
  • Vernon, R. and Lynch, D. (2000)  Social work and the web.   Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks-Cole.
  • Vest, G., Pruett, K. & Holmgren, B. (n.d). Social advocacy, brokering and networking with pc’s. Retrieved from http://www.socialworksearch.com/research/researchgv.shtml

Media Night 11.17.16 – Language Matters in #MacroSW w/ @socworkpodcast & @StuckonSW

Here is the transcript for the chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-11-17-16-language-matters-in-macrosw-w#publicize

For our November Media Night, we will be talking about how language matters in macro social work practice, specifically when talking about suicide.

Here is a link the article for our Media Night, Let’s Talk about Suicide: #LanguageMatters:

http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/practice/lets-talk-about-suicide-languagematters/.  Please read this article in preparation for Thursday’s chat.

languagemattersgreenExcerpt from the article:

Researchers have shown that even subtle changes in language can change reality (Borowditsky, 2011). Every social work student has heard the phrase “person-first” language. Instead of saying, “He is schizophrenic,” we say, “He (the person) has a diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Why? Person-first language honors the dignity and worth of the person. And although some people confuse social workers’ use of language as being “politically correct,” we know the words we use to communicate to our clients and others have power. Words can construct a reality of hope and acceptance, or despair and rejection. And when we’re talking about suicide, those words can be a matter of life or death.

#LanguageMatters are two articles featured in the New Social Worker Magazine. These covered some issues in clinical social work on the topics of Suicide and Borderline Personality Disorder. #MacroSW wanted to explore how language affects Macro practice issues.

Our hosts will be:

sj
J. Singer

Jonathan Singer, PhD, LCSW (@socworkpodcast)  is an associate professor at Loyola University in Chicago and creator of The Social Work Podcast.

 

 

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S. Erreger

Sean Erreger, LCSW (@StuckOnSW) is a Mental Health care manager and a social work adjunct instructor. In addition to his active voice on Twitter, he runs the blog Stuck on Social Work.

 

 

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Why are we talking about #LanguageMatter? Isn’t that obvious?
  2. What are preferred and problematic terms when talking about #suicide?
  3. What can organizations do to address suicide risk?
  4. What are some examples you have seen how language has affected your social work practice?
  5. What is our responsibility as social workers to point out prejudicial / discriminatory language?
  6. Can slight changes in language help change how macro social work practice is delivered?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

#MacroSW Chat – Nov. 10, 2016: It’s the Post-Election Detox / What’s On Your Mind / Fall & Winter Holidays are Coming OPEN MIC!

A swirling spiral of red and blue lines with people swept along it, leading to a ballot box.
Image: Stephen Savage for the NY Times

 

Here’s the archive of this chat.

Results are in; the winner of the US Presidential Election has been announced. The #MacroSW partners want to let everyone know that we will not assume we know how our colleagues / students / chat participants voted. #MacroSW chat will remain non-partisan in our role as the facilitator of these gloriously wide-ranging, informative, and stimulating chats. We plan on this chat being- as we hope all our chats are – trauma-informed.*  We do expect people to be expressing feelings and opinions, with comments made in a safe and respectful way in line with the Code of Ethics and the history of macro social work.** Host Pat Shelly from @UBSSW will be using the @officialmacrosw handle to further align in a neutral position.

Votes will be in and counted; the political ads will disappear.  How will you recover from this election season? Or do you want to talk about ANYTHING BUT the impact of the election?

Join us for this open mic:

  • What’s on your mind?
  • Regaining a sense of sanity after the 2016 U.S. elections.
  • Oh how those Thanksgiving and December holidays loom!!

Host: Pat Shelly @UBSSW University at Buffalo School of Social Work

We hope to have some fun, and offer ideas and resources for election season recovery! And – in case you are worried that your stress level will get too low –  we might talk about how to prepare for the November/December holidays and the often fraught family time they engender. The open mic means you can introduce whatever else is on your mind.
*6 Key Principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach:

  1. Safety;
  2. Trustworthiness and Transparency;
  3. Peer support;
  4. Collaboration and mutuality;
  5. Empowerment, voice and choice;
  6. Cultural, Historical, and Gender Issues

** “Macro social work practice includes those activities performed in organizational, community, and policy arenas. Macro practice has a diverse history that reveals conflicting ideologies and multiple theoretical perspectives (emphasis added).Programmatic, organizational, community, and policy dimensions of macro practice underscore the social work profession’s emphasis on using a person-in-environment perspective. Thus, social workers, regardless of roles played, are expected to have sensitivity toward and engage in macro practice activities.”

Netting. F.E. (2013). Macro Social Work Practice in Encyclopedia of Social Work 20th Edition. Retrieved from http://socialwork.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199975839.001.0001/acrefore-9780199975839-e-230


Resources:

To put things in perspective, here’s a satirical piece from the digital humor magazine The Onion:
ELECTION 2016: Nation Admits It’s Probably Going to Come Out of This Having Learned the Completely Wrong Lesson

And some bona fide research:

These elections are having an impact on the nation’s mental health:
Talking to Your Therapist About Election Anxiety : “‘I’ve been in private practice for 30 years, and I have never seen patients have such strong reactions to an election,’ said Sue Elias, a licensed clinical social worker in Manhattan.”

A report by the American Psychological Society shows that the 2016 elections were a source of  stress for 52% of Americans surveyed:
Stress in America: U.S. Presidential Election 2016

 

 

 

 

Get Out the Vote 11/3/16

By Rachel L. West, LMSW

Thursday November 3rd #MacroSW Chats will cover get out the vote efforts. I (@poliSW) will host the chat starting at 9:00 PM EST/6:00 PM PST.

The chat will delve into specific actions we can take to get voters to the polls on November 8th. We will also discuss long term efforts that can be taken to increase voter participation.

same-day-reg

Questions:

Q1: What GOTV efforts are you undertaking this year?

Q2: What action can be taken to reform campaign finance?

Q3: What are your ideas to positively reform the electoral process?

early-voting

Resources:

N.A. (N.D). FairVote. Retrieved from http://www.fairvote.org/.

N.A. (N.D). Voting Reform Agenda. Brennen Center for Justice. Retrieved from https://www.brennancenter.org/issues/voting-reform-agenda.

N.A. (N.D.) Yes on 5 More Voice. Retrieved from http://www.rcvmaine.com/faq.

Theroux, K. (2008). Strengthening U.S. Democracy Through Campaign Finance Reform. Carnegie Corporation of New York. Retrieved from  https://www.carnegie.org/media/filer_public/4b/5e/4b5e1520-7c54-40e3-92da-99eb2b528552/ccny_creview_2008_reform.pdf.

Media Night 10.27.16 – Inequality for All with Jimmy Young of California State University San Marcos

Here are the transcripts for tonight:

Storify Transcript: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-10-27-16-inequality-for-all-with-jimmy

Symplur Transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=10%2F27%2F2016&shour=17&smin=00&tdate=10%2F27%2F2016&thour=20&tmin=30

For our October Media Night, we will be talking about income inequality in a student-focused #MacroSW chat.  Social work students (and everyone else) from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused chat about income equality. 

Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professors Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) of California State University San Marcos (@csusmnews) will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, October 27th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

jimmyyoungOur host is Dr. Jimmy Young, an Assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at California State University San Marcos. He graduated with his PhD in social work from Virginia Commonwealth University and his MSW & MPA from Eastern Washington University. His main focus is around social work education and nonprofit organizations, and his research is centered on these two areas as they relate to the use of technology and specifically social media.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. See below for information on how to access the movie.
  2. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  3. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social work professor Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) and Laurel Hitchcock on the #MacroSW Official Twitter handle @OfficialMacroSW. Include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.
  4. Following the live chat, your instructor may also ask you to write a brief self-reflection essay about your experience of participating in this event.

The written parts of the assignment are optional and are not required to participate. However, we do encourage you to take some time to reflect upon what you learn from the film and the topics that are discussed in the chat. How might they inform your future social work practice?

To Access the Film: Click on the following link and use the password bernie2016:Inequalityforall

https://vimeo.com/141725998

Inequality for All runs 1 hour and 29 minutes, and is also available for streaming from iTunes and Amazon Prime. You can still request the DVD from Netflix. Alternatively, you can watch this interview between Bill Moyers and Robert Reich discussing the film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-rpkZe2OEo

About the Film: Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film that examines the widening income gap in the United States. Using the stories of real people and real lives, the narrative explores the effects this increasing gap has not only on the U.S. economy but also on democracy itself. Presented by American economist, author and professor Robert Reich, the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking.

Questions for the live chat:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How do we as social workers address inequality or move forward?

If you are an educator wanting to incorporate this chat as an assignment in your class, please click here for details.  We hope you can join us! Please contact Jimmy or Laurel if you plan to have your class or maybe student groups participate in the chat.  They will also welcome your questions.  

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

A #PoliticsNOW #MacroSW Chat – 10/20/16

blues poster with word select in white, and the word "elect" in parentheses. One can read it as SELECT or ELECT.
poster: AIGA the professional association for design

Join Kristin Battista-Frazee for this chat on action leading up to the November 8th elections. What’s happening your area? What is the social work profession doing to inform our constituencies (everyone, that is!) on issues, voting rights, and more?

9PM EST/ 8 PM CT/ 6 PM PT

Resources:

A Dream Undone: Disenfranchised
Rutenberg, J. (2015, July 29). A Dream Undone: Disenfranchised. The New York Times Magazine, p MM 30. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/29/magazine/voting-rights-act-dream-undone.html *

The Nancy A. Humphreys Institute for Political Social Work says: “Every social worker should read this article on the history of the voting rights act and the decades long (sic) efforts to undo it.”

Wilson, M.H. (2016 ). Social Justice Brief (Voting Rights Update). Washington, D.C.: National Association of Social Workers.

 


 

#MacroSW Media Night 10.13.16 – Online Disability Advocacy:  What is the role of allies?

Update: Chat archive now available!

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Some Rights Reserved by zeevveez

For our October Media Night, we will be discussing how social workers can become effective allies within online disability advocacy, and what does that mean and look like from members of the disabled community.

There is no denying the power online advocacy has played in ushering the disability rights movement into the 21st century.  Disabled advocates are able to discuss issues, policies, ableism, and combatting multiple identities with members of the disabled community across the country and globe, as well as paint a more rightfully diverse and genuine images of the disabled experience.  Our chat will explore how the social work profession and social workers can become effective allies, and in what ways disabled advocates desire for us to work alongside them.   

Here are a few resources that goes in-depth about what disability advocacy is, what good allyship looks like, the use of identity-first language versus person-first language, and why the social model of disability is preferred by members of the disabled community:  

What is Disability Advocacy?
http://www.daru.org.au/what-is-advocacy

So You Call Yourself An Ally?:  10 Things All ‘Allies’ Should Know
http://everydayfeminism.com/2013/11/things-allies-need-to-know/

Identity First Language
http://autisticadvocacy.org/home/about-asan/identity-first-language/

The Social Model of Disability
http://www.scope.org.uk/about-us/our-brand/social-model-of-disability

Our guest expert will be Dr. Casey Bohrman, who is the Assistant Chair of Undergraduate Social Work at West Chester University.  She teaches direct practice and social policy courses.  She integrates Twitter into her introduction to social policy class, including an assignment that requires students to document and tweet about accessibility issues in their local communities.  

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Vilissa Thompson (@VilissaThompson).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. What does it mean to be a good ally to communities that you do not have membership to?
  2. Is there a need for allies within advocacy movements?  Why or why not?  
  3. How has social media played an important role in propelling online advocacy?  
  4. Which technologies/social media platforms have been instrumental to online advocacy, and are most favored among advocates?  
  5. Does the social work profession have an out-of-date view and understanding of disability?  
  6. What can we do as social workers to better connect with the disabled community, and be effective allies?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Advancing Long and Productive Lives- 10/06/16 #MacroSW Chat

(Here is the archive of all the tweets from this chat)

 

Official GCSW_Logo

 

 

 

cover of the report on "Increasing Productive Engagement in Later Life"

What does healthy aging and productivity look like in the 21st century? Baby boomers are retiring later, millennials are starting families and technology continuously offers new ways to delegate tasks.

One Grand Challenges for Social Work paper explained the trends as follows:

“Increased automation and longevity demand new thinking by employers and employees regarding productivity. Young people are increasingly disconnected from education or work and the labor force faces significant retirements in the next decades. Throughout the lifespan, fuller engagement in education and paid and unpaid productive activities can generate a wealth of benefits, including better health and well-being, greater financial security, and a more vital society.”

Man with white hair in clear goggles and blue cape raises fist, as does his young male sidekick in goggles and red cape.
Superhero and sidekick. Image: Beth Johnson Foundation

The challenge of reshaping social expectations, institutions, policies, and programs so we can benefit from the older population and its growing social capital is more important than ever.

Join us on Thursday, October 6, 2016, at 9pm ET, 8pm CT and 6pm PT:

We’ll chat about how ways to increase ongoing engagement with and productivity by our older Americans.

Hosts:
Pat Shelly, University at Buffalo School of Social Work @UBSSW
Mikhail Bell, representing the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare @AASWSW

Questions for Discussion:

  1. Why is increasing productive engagement in later life a Grand Challenge for Social Work?
  2. What is productive aging?
  3. How does productive engagement benefit society?
  4. How can social work lead the way with this challenge?
  5. What are some examples of productive engagement for later life? Any from your community?
  6. Do you have new ideas or visions for a productive later life?

RESOURCES

 

Teresa Minja speaks out at the U.N. on the need for a convention on the rights of older people. Image: Help Age International
Teresa Minja speaks out at the U.N. on the need for a convention on the rights of older people. Image: Help Age International
white woman with white hair and big black sunglassed in night club in front of turntable.
Mamy Rock, a British DJ in her 70’s, made appearances across Europe. Image: SPOA films

 

 

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

Media Night 9.29.16 – Environmental Justice

Here is the transcript for this chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-9-29-16-environmental-justice 

For our September Media Night, we will be talking about environmental justice as an important area of macro social work practice.

environmentaljustice_imageEnvironmental justice gets at the notion that all people have a right to a clean, safe, environment regardless of their race, ethnicity, SES, gender, and no matter where they live. In this chat, we’ll be discussing lead exposure as an environmental justice issue of particular importance to social workers.

Here is a link the article, Freddie Gray’s life a study on the effects of lead paint on poor blacks by Terrence McCoy of the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/freddie-grays-life-a-study-in-the-sad-effects-of-lead-paint-on-poor-blacks/2015/04/29/0be898e6-eea8-11e4-8abc-d6aa3bad79dd_story.html.

samantha-teixeira-513x336Our host will is Dr. Samantha Teixeira from the School of Social Work at Boston College. Samantha Teixeira, PhD, joined the faculty at the School of Social Work in 2015. Her research focuses on how neighborhood environmental conditions affect youth and how youth can be engaged in creating solutions to environmental problems in their communities. In order to better address neighborhood environmental disparities, Dr. Teixeira utilizes a community based participatory research approach to identify community environmental issues and learn how they shape life in disadvantaged neighborhoods, particularly among youth. In her work, she uses innovative, mixed methods approaches including photography, community mapping, in-depth interviews, and spatial analysis to uncover the perspectives of neighborhood residents and intervene in community problems.

She has published on the topics of place-based, comprehensive community interventions that address neighborhood environmental disparities, youth-led participatory research, and environmental justice interventions and education. Samantha’s diverse practice experience includes work in child protective services, community organizing and development, and local government initiatives.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Would you consider lead exposure to be an environmental justice (EJ) issue? Why?
  2. Why is lead exposure an important environmental/contextual consideration when considering the life and death of Freddie Gray?
  3. EJ issues have been called a form of “slow violence” that causes injury more slowly than typical acts of violence. How does slow violence relate to Gray’s Baltimore community?
  4. In the graphic “Baltimore neighborhoods with elevated lead levels” click to see maps illustrating lead levels, vacant property, & child poverty. What do you see here?
  5. This article illustrates many interconnections between micro and macro social work issues. Identify issues at different systems levels and how they interconnect.
  6. The article alludes to the connection between lead exposure and violence. How do you think these issues relate?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.