Media Night 9.29.16 – Environmental Justice

For our September Media Night, we will be talking about environmental justice as an important area of macro social work practice.

environmentaljustice_imageEnvironmental justice gets at the notion that all people have a right to a clean, safe, environment regardless of their race, ethnicity, SES, gender, and no matter where they live. In this chat, we’ll be discussing lead exposure as an environmental justice issue of particular importance to social workers.

Here is a link the article, Freddie Gray’s life a study on the effects of lead paint on poor blacks by Terrence McCoy of the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/freddie-grays-life-a-study-in-the-sad-effects-of-lead-paint-on-poor-blacks/2015/04/29/0be898e6-eea8-11e4-8abc-d6aa3bad79dd_story.html.

samantha-teixeira-513x336Our host will is Dr. Samantha Teixeira from the School of Social Work at Boston College. Samantha Teixeira, PhD, joined the faculty at the School of Social Work in 2015. Her research focuses on how neighborhood environmental conditions affect youth and how youth can be engaged in creating solutions to environmental problems in their communities. In order to better address neighborhood environmental disparities, Dr. Teixeira utilizes a community based participatory research approach to identify community environmental issues and learn how they shape life in disadvantaged neighborhoods, particularly among youth. In her work, she uses innovative, mixed methods approaches including photography, community mapping, in-depth interviews, and spatial analysis to uncover the perspectives of neighborhood residents and intervene in community problems.

She has published on the topics of place-based, comprehensive community interventions that address neighborhood environmental disparities, youth-led participatory research, and environmental justice interventions and education. Samantha’s diverse practice experience includes work in child protective services, community organizing and development, and local government initiatives.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Would you consider lead exposure to be an environmental justice (EJ) issue? Why?
  2. Why is lead exposure an important environmental/contextual consideration when considering the life and death of Freddie Gray?
  3. EJ issues have been called a form of “slow violence” that causes injury more slowly than typical acts of violence. How does slow violence relate to Gray’s Baltimore community?
  4. In the graphic “Baltimore neighborhoods with elevated lead levels” click to see maps illustrating lead levels, vacant property, & child poverty. What do you see here?
  5. This article illustrates many interconnections between micro and macro social work issues. Identify issues at different systems levels and how they interconnect.
  6. The article alludes to the connection between lead exposure and violence. How do you think these issues relate?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

 

HIV/AIDs Prevention & Treatment: #MacroSW 9/22 at 9pm EST

Chat archive now available!

My “Until There’s a Cure” bracelet, which I’ve worn since my MSW internship on HIV/AIDs in 1998-1999.

According to aids.gov:

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. If left untreated, HIV can lead to the disease AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Unlike some other viruses, the human body can’t get rid of HIV completely. So once you have HIV, you have it for life…No effective cure for HIV currently exists, but with proper treatment and medical care, HIV can be controlled…Today, a person who is diagnosed with HIV, treated before the disease is far advanced, and stays on treatment can live a nearly as long as someone who does not have HIV.

As recently as June 2016:

  • More than 1.2 million people in the US are living with HIV, and 1 in 8 of them don’t know it.
  • Over the last decade, the annual number of new HIV diagnoses declined 19%.
  • Gay and bisexual men, particularly young African American gay and bisexual men, are most affected.

However, statistics do not capture the whole story. Aaron Laxton, an AIDS Activist, Youtube Blogger, Writer, Social-Engineer, and MSW student at Saint Louis University, often publishes about his experience with HIV:

Join us as we discuss HIV/AIDs prevention and treatment and implications for macro social work practice.  Our chat questions will be:

  1. What do I need to know about HIV?
  2. What do I need to know about HIV prevention?
  3. What’s treatment as prevention (TaP)?
  4. How effective is PrEP?
  5. What are resources in your community for PrEP?
  6. Where can I learn more about social work and HIV prevention and treatment?

For this conversation, we will also be joined by:

davidfawcettDavid Fawcett, PhD, LCSWcropped-with-mark-2016_06_22-19_46_05-utcDavid Fawcett is an
expert on stigma and mental health and substance abuse problems in the LGBT community in Florida. Separate from his clinical practice, he presents workshops on chronic illness, substance abuse and mental health in the LGBT community.

 

 

evelyn-tomaszewski

Evelyn Tomaszewski, MSW. Evelyn Tomaszewski is NASW senior policy associate in the Human Rights and Social Justice Department and directs the NASW HIV/AIDS Spectrum Project. She is staff to the NASW National Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues, and she can address the impact of policy, programs, and laws on LGBT individuals and families. Her work focuses on building capacity to address LGBT human rights, violence prevention and early intervention, and HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment.

 

Toxic Masculinity is a Macro Social Work Issue

Chat archive now available!

 

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Here’s a link to the trailer for “The Mask You Live In.”  This documentary on the American “boy crisis” explains how to raise a healthier generation of men and features interviews with experts and academics. What does it mean to be a man? American society might be pushing a masculinity on our boys that destroys them.

 

 

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The 91 minute film is available for viewing on Netflix.

 

#MacroSW Chat Sept. 8: Moving from Conversation to Action

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As we celebrated our last day of summer this Labor Day weekend, let’s not forget the true intention of the holiday is to recognize the labor movement and its workers. In this spirit let’s talk about how a conversation among like-minded people becomes a social change movement. There isn’t a straightforward path to creating a movement but our profession is full of stellar examples and social workers who have taken an idea or a wish and turned it into an actionable cause. Join us for the #MacroSW chat on Thursday, Sept. 8 at 9 pm EST (6 pm Pacific) to discuss moving from conversation to action.

Advocacy happens every day in big and small ways and in communities across the country. We don’t have to look far for examples. Consider the 10 NASW chapters who are collectively advocating to keep their decision-making power and the recent unveiling of Secretary Hillary Clinton’s mental health agenda which in this election year we can play an active role to shape this policy.  There are many other tangible change initiatives social workers can participate in. We can look to history too, such as the labor, civil rights, and women’s movement, and appreciate that monumental change is possible.

This chat is to follow up on our July post conversation to action, in the wake of the shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile and the sniper attack on Dallas police, which encouraged people to share advocacy activities happening in communities in our crowdsourcing document to curate a list of places where you could share your social work expertise.

On this chat, we’ll discuss things happening right now, as well as pay homage to our profession’s history of moving conversations to advocacy work. Social injustice has not only outraged us but motivated organizing efforts. Social workers have artful weaved a “feet on the ground” approach with theory and are skilled at collaboration to guide community organizing work.

For this chat, we’ll discuss the following questions.

  1. What was the tipping point that pushed you to work on a cause or issue?
  2. How has social media played a key role in your activism?
  3. Share tactics which have helped you or your organization solve a community problem?
  4. What issues are you currently working on and where do you need additional help in your community?
  5. Share events or initiatives where social workers can be involved in a cause. Also, add to our crowdsourcing Google doc so we can Tweet about them later!

Resources

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Community Building/Self Care for Social Workers in Today’s Complex Times

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(The archive of this chat can be found here.)

 

Many are drawn to the profession of social work because they want to help others, contribute to problems at every level of human interaction, and create lasting societal  change. Newly minted professionals and seasoned veterans in all practice settings give great time, service and energy  in commitment to the betterment of our society. Most social workers routinely encourage clients to set interpersonal boundaries,  tend to their needs and pay attention to the consequences of not doing so.  Unfortunately, in our zeal to do our work well, we may find ourselves caring for others while neglecting care for ourselves. The cost of self-neglect can present as ongoing, relentless stress, that can siphon away one’s overall health and well-being,  show up as compassion fatigue and even result in burn out so severe that we may find ourselves walking away from the field of work we love. Today’s clients present with multi-layered problems requiring skilled navigation through social systems that are often obsolete and ineffective. Social workers are often asked to do more with less. The results can be disastrous with personal and professional consequences.

The social work community has begun to come together to identify the obstacles to self care, assess the high cost of neglect, and has begun to develop a culture of self care, that was not present in years past. Increasingly, as a profession, the need for self-care is being recognized as necessary and  a fundamental professional competency worthy of training, research and resource development.

Questions for discussion:

  • How do you define self-care?
  • How can we develop a strong community of support in creating addressing self care in our work?
  • What personal tips can you share for self care this season?
  • What are the obstacles to self care in light of today’s professional challenges
  • in social work?
  • What are the consequences of putting our client’s (and agency’s) needs above our own?
  • What resources do you use in creating a self-care plan?
  • How do you discuss self care with your students?
  • What have you incorporated into your self care that you have added since last year?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Mic/Summer Self-Care Forum 7-28-2016

 

Once again, we reach that time of year when  #MacroSW chat will take a moment to have an open mic session as friends, colleagues and students to talk about what’s most important in our profession as social workers and allied colleagues. The topic? Whatever we please! While we are at it, let’s all share best self-care practices that have been helpful for the summer season and during this tumultuous season of change. Share what you have tucked away in your beach bag, favorite summer comfort foods, music selections, best summer beverage selections, as well as “staycation”, sabbatical and or travel plans. Bring your best memes and gifs suitable for the occasion.

MacroSW will break for the month of August resuming  Thursday, September, 8, 2016.

 

Breaking Down Advocacy Silos to Strengthen Macro-Level Change

Read the chat summary on Storify here.

Social Workers & Community Psychologists, Allies from Intersecting Domains

With pressing social issues and conflicts around the globe regularly calling out for intelligent, effective, and compassion solutions, the need for greater cooperation among diverse disciplines in the fields of community-related work is stronger now more than ever. Fostering interdisciplinary collaborations can go a long way in creating the macro-level societal change that impacts those issues. But as can be the case in academic fields of discourse, professionals hunker down in their “advocacy silos” (in the scientific professional, this can be called “stovepiping”) not aware of the larger context of other related fields and their resources, their interdependent relationships, and the great potential for healthful, societally beneficial collaboration.

Two fields in particular — community psychology and macro social work — share overlapping values and each field has unique talents and resources that they can share. How are the practices of macro social work and community psychology similar yet distinct? What can social workers and community psychologists do to collaborate for macro-level social change? Join us for a Twitter chat on Thursday, July 21, 9-10 p.m. EDT, for a discussion on these and other questions and related topics, including sharing of resources, practices, and research across these disciplines that are at the intersection of social change and working toward greater community well-being.

Hosts

Rachel L. West (@poliSW), L.M.S.W., Advocacy & Community Outreach Consultant, ACOSA (@acosaorg) Board Member, & Instructor at Stony Brook University-School of Social Welfare

Peter Charles Benedict, M.A. (@petebenedict), Outreach and Communications Specialist, Society for Community Research and Action (@scra)

Taylor Scott (@jtaybscott), Administrative Coordinator, Society for Community Research and Action

Special Guests

Jean Hill , Ph.D. (@jeanhillnm), SCRA Past President, and Director of Institutional Research, New Mexico Highlands University

James R. Cook, Ph.D. (@jimcookuncc), SCRA Past President, and Professor of Psychology, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Questions we will consider in this twitter chat

— What is community psychology and how is it distinct yet similar to social work?

— What are the primary goals and motivations of community psychology?

— What resources (practices, research, etc.) does community psychology offer?

— What resources does macro social work offer?

— What questions do you have about either community psychology or macro social work?

— How can social workers and community psychologists better work together to share resources and collaborate?

— What were some good collaborations you were a part of, and what were the benefits?

— What types of circumstances have you found yourself in that would have benefited from a collaboration, and if it didn’t happen, then why not?

Resources

What is Community Psychology?

Check out a brief VIDEO that describes community psychology. You can find additional information on the website for the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA), which describes CP research, training programs, and includes information on and relevant resources. Also find SCRA on Twitter (@scra), Facebook, and LinkedIn.

What is Macro Social Work?

The Association for Community Organization and Social Administration

The Society for Community Research and Action (@scra), a division of the American Psychological Association, is an 1,100-member professional organization devoted to advancing community research and social action, and it also serves and supports many different disciplines engaged in community work. SCRA members are committed to promoting health and empowerment and to preventing problems in communities, groups, and individuals. SCRA’s vision is to have a strong, global impact on enhancing well-being and promoting social justice for all people by fostering collaboration where there is division and empowerment where there is oppression. Learn more at scra27.org.

Conversation to Action

Christian Joudrey
Photo credit: Christian Joudrey via Unsplash

The shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile and the sniper attack on Dallas police is stirring racial tensions and left us saddened, grieving and questioning how we move forward to create more just and safe communities. We are loudly saying enough is enough across social media and in quiet conversations with friends, family and colleagues.  We’re tired of condolence statements and outraged by the little or no action by elected officials and leaders in our communities.

Social workers are uniquely equipped and want to constructively solve these challenging problems and create real solutions. After all, it’s in our DNA to act, advocate and heal, whether it’s through smarter gun control, access to mental health treatment or legislation, political participation and policy work. We will tackle inequities still prevalent, unacknowledged and exploited for political purposes. Many right now are fighting the good fight, and we’re ready to roll-up our sleeves to do more but how, when and where we can jump in is a big question for some of us.

Our #MacroSW group will direct our activities to engage our vast network of social workers who are ready to go beyond conversation to action and plug into current advocacy activities happening in communities.  We will be sharing on @OfficialMacroSW about events, letter writing campaigns, or policy initiatives that need our support and participation. Also you can:

  • Join and contribute to this Google document which will curate an ongoing list of events, activities, petitions, rally dates, etc. on a national and local level in which you can actively participate in to make a difference. This crowdsourcing effort will create a robust listing of places you can plug into and apply your social work expertise.
  • Got an idea for chat for us to discuss an advocacy effort? Contact us by direct message on @OfficialMacroSW, comment here or email kbfrazee@gmail.com or officialmacrosw@gmail.com to let us know so we can schedule time in our weekly chats and offer our platform to curate the best ideas and research to help your cause.
  • Post on the #MacroSW hashtag anytime to continue to collaborate and have conversations. Please share resources and ideas.
  • Check out the new public list, Stop the Violence, on @OfficialMacroSW that curates a collection of resources, organizations and individuals who are also taking action.
  • Two great reference lists have been developed to educate the public, social workers, and advocates as to why Black Lives Matter:  Understanding Systematic Oppression in the United States:  A Reference List for #BlackLivesMatter, and Race and Policing Research.

It will take all of us in big and small ways to change our country’s current path, and as social workers, we will do what we have always done, give people who can’t speak or act for themselves a voice.

July 14, 2016

 

Technology Standards in Social Work Practice: Give NASW feedback — #MacroSW Chat 07-14-16

words "digital technology" floats over a background og computer code, all in tones of blue.
Image: Alexander Moore Digital Media

Read the Storify summary of this chat here – our “biggest” chat ever!

Also, here is another version of the transcript with stats from Symplur.

(Note: The post that is reblogged below is by Laurel Hitchcock.  Laurel is one of the nine #MacroSW partners who rotate as host of our weekly Twitter chats. Her blog post below is a good introduction to our July 14 chat, hosted by @ubssw and @officialmacrosw.  We find it especially useful due to her use of a specific example –  one of the standards on social work education – and the NASW interpretation of the ethical use of technology. This example underscores the importance of feedback to NASW on the draft for these standards.

The task force that wrote this draft of the standards includes the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), Clinical Social Work Association (CSWA), and the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB). This is the first update on Technology Standards since 2005.

Please join us for the July 14th chat. Your comments and tweets will be included in the comments that our #MacroSW Chat group submits to NASW before the deadline on the 20th.)

The following is reblogged from http://www.laureliversonhitchcock.org/

Join the Convo – NASW needs feedback on Draft Technology Standards in SW

figure_with_megaphone_wearing_sign_18127I am so pleased that the draft Technology Standards for Social Work Practice have been released for public review.  NASW, CSWE, CSWA, and ASWB developed a task force to collaboratively draft these technology standards, which you can access the draft standards here.

I am working with several groups to provide comments to the task force and, I also plan to submit my own comments.  Once adopted, these standards will be considered a model for best practice in social work. Given the important legal and ethical role that practice standards have in the professional lives of social workers, I believe it is essential to offer constructive and timely feedback on this document.  I want to encourage everyone in the social work community to review and submit their feedback.  You do not need to be a member of any group to offer feedback. The timeline is short for submitting comments – the one-month comment period closes July 20th.

Here are some highlights about the document. The draft standards and their interpretations are 82 pages.  If you do not want to read 82 pages, you may want to know that these standards cover the following:

  • Section 1: Provision of Information to the Public
  • Section 2: Designing and Delivering Services – Part A: Individuals, Families, and Groups and Part B: Communities, Organizations, Administration, and Policy
  • Section 3: Gathering, Managing, and Storing Information
  • Section 4: Communication with and about Clients
  • Section 5: Social Work Education (especially distance education)

Overall, I applaud the effort to revise standards that are over a decade old and  no longer relevant to many forms of technology commonly used by social workers in their professional lives.  It is a challenging task to write effective and informative standards that will help social workers navigate the use of technology in practice with the fast pace of change in digital and social technologies. A definite strength of the committee’s work is that the standards strongly reflect the NASW Code of Ethics, with multiple references to the Code throughout the standards.

However, these standards are also very specific, providing detailed directions on how social workers should use technology in an ethical and professional manner.  For example, under Standard 5.10: Educator-Student Boundaries, the interpretation of the standard recommend that “to maintain appropriate boundaries with students, social work educators should avoid the use of personal technological devices and accounts for professional (educational) purposes.” As a social work educator, I agree that all educators should maintain appropriate ethical and professional boundaries with students and colleagues, but I should have the choice and autonomy in how I establish and maintain those boundaries. I’d like to see the evidence that using my personal smart phone to answer calls or texts from students violates an ethical boundary. In fact, I believe it makes me more accessible to my students. I started using text messaging with students many years ago, after working for a semester with a student who had a hearing disability. Texting was easier for the student to ask me questions, and allowed us to communicate outside of class without an interpreter.  As a result of this experience, I developed guidelines for texting with students which I still follow today.

Further, many of the standards address the use of technology in practice settings without recognizing the parallel situations such as the “in-person” equivalent or the use of more commonplace technology.  Considering Standard 5.10 as described above, this would suggest that social work educators should never give out their home phone to students or call students from their home phones.  Further, this interpretation would suggest that educators not answer emails or access their institution’s learning management system from a home or personal computer or tablet. All of these options are impractical to me, and would result in an undue burden for the educator, especially adjunct educators who often use personal technology to communicate with students.

I would like to see these standards modified to offer practical, clear, and realistic guidelines that can be adopted and operationalized by both social workers and social service agencies across all practice settings. One of the groups I am working with to write group feedback has drafted this statement, which I believe provides an ideal general recommendation for how the draft standards can be re-framed:

push_the_bullseye_400_clr_18524The guidance provided by these technology standards should support aspirational goals related to technology use in our profession (including access, innovation, and consumer protection and voice), and encourage thoughtful and professional judgment related to technology use, while not directly specifying how one should carry out their use of technology in social work practice. To do so, limits innovation and will cause those who already practice outside the scope of these standards (or will in the near future as these standards become dated) to seek identity alignment outside of social work.

While you may agree or disagree with my interpretation of the draft standards, I urge you to read through the standards and give your feedback.  This is your opportunity to join the conversation and give back to your professional community.

If you are interested in working with a group to provide feedback, here are two options:

  • Participate in the #MacroSW Twitter Chat on July 14th at 8:00 PM CST/ 9 PM EST when we will discuss the draft standards from a macro social work perspective. We will share the transcript with NASW.

Here are the details about how and when to submit your individual feedback:

TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS IN SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE – Draft released on 6/20/16

Description from NASW: The draft Technology Standards in Social Work Practice were developed jointly by the National Association of Social Workers, Association of Social Work Boards, Council on Social Work Education, and the Clinical Social Work Association to create a uniform set of practice guidelines for professional social workers who incorporate technology into their services. The draft standards were developed by a task force comprised of representatives from each of these social work organizations.

Request from NASW:

Your comments and feedback are requested to help make the technology standards a model best practice document for social workers. Please consider the following questions as you review the standards:

  1. Are the standards easy to comprehend?
  2. Are there any concepts that require clarification?
  3. Are the standards applicable across social work practice levels and settings?
  4. How relevant are the standards to current social work practice?

Submit your comments no later than July 20, 2016. Comments regarding the content of the draft standards are preferred rather than edits.

Here are two additional questions specific to the July 14th #MacroSW Twitter Chat:

  1. What are ways you think macro-level social works should use technology?
  2. What perspectives do social workers bring to the use of technology in the 21st century?

 

http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/naswstandards/TechnologyStandardsInSocialWorkPractice/CommentSubmission.aspx

Addendum: This is the link to the Storify version of the tweets from this chat: https://storify.com/UBSSW/technology-standards-in-social-work-practice-give-

#MacroSW Media Night 6/30/16 – Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA

Click here for a copy of the chat transcript.

downloadFor our June Media Night, we will be watching Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA produced by Frontline.  Here is the description of the movie:

In Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA, FRONTLINE goes inside the politics of America’s gun debate. Veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk investigates the NRA, its political evolution and influence, and how it has consistently succeeded in defeating new gun control legislation.

Here is a link the movie (54 minutes): http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/gunned-down/.  You can watch the movie for free.  

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the special interests influencing the gun debate in America? #MacroSW
  2. How are current gun policies affecting your community? And the individuals & families who live in your community? #MacroSW
  3. How can we start talking about gun policies in America in more inclusive way; with less divisiveness? #MacroSW
  4. How do our professional ethics guide social workers in responding to the gun debate? #MacroSW
  5. What lessons about lobbying have you learned that can be applied to #MacroSW?
  6. What single word best describes how the film made you feel? #MacroSW
  7. What’s next? How do we as social workers promote practical solutions to the gun debates in America? #MacroSW

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com