Is the High Tech Social Worker a Myth or Reality? Let’s Discuss on Jan. 12

high-tech-sw

View chat archive and Symplur data.

It is commonly said that technology has changed our personal lives and impacted social work practice. We have seen technology shape some big innovations, such as counseling provided online and across state lines, the creation of global advocacy communities at a swipe, and healthcare information stored in the cloud and accessible from anywhere.

With these rapid changes, we should examine whether or not social workers are keeping up in a digital world.  More specifically, is the high-tech social worker a myth or reality? There is no clear-cut answer to this question. While many social workers are early technology adopters and traditionalists have been resistant to change.

Join us for the #MacroSW chat on Thursday, Jan. 12 at 9 pm EST (6 pm Pacific) to discuss if the high-tech social worker is a myth or reality.

This topic is based on the Kristin Battista-Frazee’s, #MacroSW partner and chat host @porndaughter, upcoming article in Social Work Today entitled High Tech Social Worker: Myth or Reality?  

We will explore how social workers can become more tech savvy to avoid being left behind in the healthcare profession of the 21st century and discuss the challenges in using technology in practice. Also, our top professional associations are finalizing the technology standards in social work practice which are due out this spring.  This guidance will have an indelible impact on the social work profession, so let’s share any last thoughts in addition to the many thoughtfully comments already submitted to NASW and the committee.

Questions to Discuss

  1. What are the ways technology has impacted social work practice the most?
  2. What are the pros and cons of technology in social work practice?
  3. What are the barriers for social workers using technology?
  4. Some social workers are resistant to adapting to technology, how can we help them catch-up?
  5. What do you hope will be reflected in the updated technology standards in social work practice due out this spring 2017?
  6. Is the high-tech social worker a myth or reality?

Resources

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Macro Social Work Practice Ethics: #MacroSW Twitter Chat 11/19 at 9pm EST

hamccabe

Update 11/19/15: Chat archive now available!

Social workers are often asked to consider the ethics of working with their clients in a therapeutic relationship. Here we will discuss the implications of ethics working along the full continuum of social work – from micro to macro. Most have heard about ethical issues like Confidentiality, Dual Relationships, and Sexual Relationships. How do ethics look when working with communities? What ethical obligations do social workers have to work for social justice when working one on one with clients?

We will explore how practitioners and students view ethical obligations around macro practice and social justice issues. Our guest expert is Heather McCabeAssistant Professor of Social Work at Indiana University.  She served as a medical social worker at a pediatric tertiary care hospital for several years before returning to school for her law degree.  She also served as the Director of the Public Health Law Program  and then Executive Director for the Hall Center for Law and Health at the IU School of Law – Indianapolis before coming to her current position.  Professor McCabe’s research is primarily in the areas of public health, health policy, health disparities, health reform, and disability related policy.  She is particularly interested in exploring the effects of multidisciplinary education and collaboration in her work.

Questions to be explored:

  1. Do you think about the NASW Code of Ethics applying to community organizing, policy practice, advocacy? If so, how?
  2. If you see multiple clients with the same systemic issue, do you have any ethical obligation to address the issue?
  3. What types of bills do you see as impacting your clients? What responsibility to you have to advocate for/educate about them?
  4. Do you advocate for policy in your day to day work? Give an example.
  5. How do we continue encouraging social workers to see practice as a continuum, which includes macro practice?

Resources:

  • Reisch, M. & Lowe, J.I. (2000). “Of means and ends” revisited: Teaching ethical community organizing in an unethical society. Journal of Community Practice, 7(1), 19-38.
  • Hardina, D. (2000). Guidelines for ethical practice in community organization. Social Work, 49(4), 595-604.
  • Harrington, D., & Dolgoff, R. (2008). Hierarchies of Ethical Principles for Ethical Decision Making in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare, 2(2), 183–196. doi:10.1080/17496530802117680
  • National Association of Social Workers. (2008).  Code of ethics of the National Association of Social Workers. Washington, DC: NASW Press.
  • Rome, S.H.,Hoechstetter, S., and Wolf-Branigin, M. (2010). Pushing the envelope: Empowering clients through political action. Journal of Policy Practice, 9(3-4), 201-219.
  • Rome, S.H. (2009). Value inventory for policy advocacy. In E.P Congress, P.N. Black, and K. Strom-Gottfried (Eds.) Teaching Social Work Values and Ethics. Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education.

About us:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held bimonthly on Twitter on the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

For information about how to participate in the MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: https://macrosw.wordpress.com.

Our Advocates, Ourselves: Building Micro Macro Common Ground. #MacroSW Chat 4/23 9PM EST

Some rights reserved by .reid.
Some rights reserved by .reid.

Update 4/23/15: Chat archive now available!

Join us for a chat with guest expert Michael Brooks as we discuss building common ground between micro and macro social work practice. Our chat partner will be Michael Brooks, MSW, BCD, the Director, Policy and Business Development for the Center for Clinical Social Work. The Center is the parent organization for the American Board of Examiners in Clinical Social Work, which issues the Board Certified Diplomate Credential in Clinical Social Work (ABE), and the American Clinical Social Work Association (ACSWA), the first online, social media-based association for clinical social work. He also maintains a small private psychotherapy, EAP and consulting practice in the city of Sonoma, CA. He served on the Board of Directors for the Employee Assistance Society of North America (EASNA), from 2005-2011, is currently on the Board of Directors for ACMHA: The College for Behavioral Health Leadership,  is a member of the California Social Work Education Council (CalSWEC) Mental Health Committee, is one of the authors/collaborators of the SBIRT Training manual for EAPs, and is the clinical consultant for the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance (pro-bono). He is currently also on the Steering Committee of the NORC Training Program for Adolescent Substance Abuse Screening, Brief Intervention and Treatment (SBIRT) in Schools of Social Work and Nursing.

CHAT QUESTIONS:

  1. True or false – splitting social work practice into micro and macro practice is a good idea.
  2. How can macro practice social workers inform clinical social workers about the importance of being involved with policy and how it can directly affect their practice?
  3. How can macro practice social workers help clinicians become more involved in advocacy? Why this is important?
  4. How can clinical social workers best participate in policy actions (i.e. ACA, Medicare rates, Medicaid funding, rate reimbursement) to enable better clinical work to happen in communities?
  5. How can CSWs inform macro practice SWs about the effects of policy on day-to-day practice
  6. How can clinicians and macro focused social workers help primary care and mental health treatment integration happen more effectively?
  7. How can macro and micro social work practice be integrated more effectively, both in practice and academia?

CHAT RESOURCES:

ABOUT #MACROSW
#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held bimonthly on Twitter on the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). For more information, chat schedule, and chat archives check out: https://macrosw.wordpress.com
 
Our collaborators include:

Advocacy in Social Work Practice: #MacroSW Chat March 26, 2015

by University at Buffalo School of Social Work #UBSSW

(see the Storify summary here:
https://storify.com/UBSSW/advocacy-in-social-work-practice-summary-of-macros )

image: Collaborative for Communication Access via Captioning
image: Collaborative for Communication Access via Captioning

Advocacy is the heart of social work.

The NASW Code of Ethics addresses this in the Preamble:

“Social workers promote social justice and social change with and on behalf of clients. Fundamental to social work is attention to the environmental forces that create, contribute to, and address problems in living…[we] strive to end discrimination, oppression, poverty, and other forms of social injustice. These activities may be in the form of direct practice, community organizing, supervision, consultation administration, advocacy, social and political action, policy development and implementation, education, and research and evaluation. Social workers seek to enhance the capacity of people to address their own needs. Social workers also seek to promote the responsiveness of organizations, communities, and other social institutions to individuals’ needs and social problems.”

All six ethical principles – service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity and competence – can be applied to advocacy in macro, mezzo and micro areas of social work practice.

Here are some questions for our discussion:

  1. How do you define advocacy?
  2. What have been your own experiences of advocacy?
  3. What skills are needed to be an effective advocate?
  4. If you are a SW educator or student: what is taught about advocacy in your school?
  5. How can we measure outcomes of advocacy?
  6. What are current issues for bettering the SW profession?

We hope you will join us this Thursday at 9pm ET / 8 PM CT / 6 PM PT !

Resources

NASW Advocacy page

The ABCs of Lobbying
https://naswnys.org/legislation-and-advocacy/abcs-of-lobbying/

Dalrymple, J. and Boylan, J. (2013). Effective Advocacy in Social Work. London: Sage.

Social Worker & Professor Kristie Holmes’ Run for Congress: http://www.politicalsocialworker.org/micro-to-macro/

Vice-President Inonge Wina of Zambia: Social Work Prepared Her for Politics
http://socialwork.columbia.edu/news-events/social-work-practice-prepared-her-politics-says-zambias-first-woman-vice-president

How Social Workers Can Engage Congress in the Pursuit of Social Justice / Network for Social Work Management

Student Reflections on the 2015 Legislative Action Day

Dorothy I. Height and Whitney M. Young, Jr. Social Work Reinvestment Act
https://www.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/senate-bill/997

Freddolino, PP, Moxley, DP, Hyduk, CA (2004). A Differential Model of Advocacy in Social Work Practice, in Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services 85:1, pp 119-128.

Payne, M. (Ed.) (2014) Modern Social Work Theory 4th Ed.   London: Palgrave Macmillan OR New York: St. Martin’s Press. See Chapter 11 Empowerment and Advocacy

How to Participate

To participate in the #MacroSW Twitter chat, go to the search box and enter the hashtag #MacroSW and then click on “all.” To join in the discussion include #MacroSW in all your tweets, including replies.

#MacroSW chats takes place on Twitter on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. The chat is a collaboration between the Association for Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA) @acosaorg, The Network for Social Work Management (NSWM) @TheNSWM, USC School of Social Work @MSWatUSC, the University at Buffalo School of Social Work @UBSSW, Karen Zgoda @karenzgoda, and Sunya Folayan @SunyaFolayan.

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