Media Night on 5/25/17: Indian Child Welfare Act with Melanie Sage and National Indian Child Welfare Association

Transcript from this chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-on-5-25-17-indian-child-welfare-act-wi

For our Maimagesy Media Night, we will be talking about the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). ICWA, a federal law passed in 1978, seeks to keep American Indian and Alaskan Native children with their families. Although nearly forty years have passed since this problem was identified and a legal intervention made, American Indian children are still significantly overrepresented in foster care. The ICWA law is often not properly upheld, and has not addressed the problem it was designed to fix. There are no clear means of enforcing ICWA outside of court appeal.

Major components of ICWA include: 1) the need for active efforts to prevent removal of AI/AN children from their families and to reunify them as soon as there are no longer imminent risks to safety; 2) placement preference to keep children with family, cultural community, or an AI/AN family if they must be placed out of home or adopted; and 3) communication with the tribe with whom the child is enrolled whenever the public child welfare agency intervenes.

Here is a link to four short YouTube videos that share the stories of families affected by ICWA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpxlN7vL_lA&list=PLDv7Yx44CyGQWp2gwf094UnZBeKnMJx5w

These stories were produced by National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) and are called The Heart of ICWA.

Our guest hosts will be Melanie Sage (@melaniesage) , PhD, LICSW, Assistant Professor at the University of North Dakota, and the National Indian Child Welfare Association (@NativeChildren).

MelanieSageMelanie Sage is a child welfare researcher, and is currently leading a statewide ICWA compliance improvement project. This $2.5 million federally funded project seeks to bring stakeholders together across systems to improve ICWA compliance and the rate at which AI/AN children are protected safely with their families and in their communities after contact with child welfare systems.

downloadThe National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is a national voice for American Indian children and families. We are the most comprehensive source of information on American Indian child welfare and the only national American Indian organization focused specifically on the tribal capacity to prevent child abuse and neglect.  NICWA is a private, nonprofit, membership organization based in Portland, Oregon. Our members include tribes, individuals—both Indian and non-Indian—and private organizations from around the United States concerned with American Indian child and family issues.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Why is the ICWA federal law of 1978 insufficient for changing child welfare practice?
  2. Whose responsibility is it to enforce ICWA, and how should they be held accountable?
  3. How can child welfare agencies become more responsive to the value of family and cultural connections?
  4. How can social workers be better advocates for ICWA?
  5. What will you do to defend ICWA?
  6. What was the most piece of information you learned about ICWA from this chat and why?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 01/26/2017 – Status of Child Welfare Workforce in US

Here is the transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=01%2F26%2F2017&shour=17&smin=30&tdate=01%2F26%2F2017&thour=19&tmin=30

For our January Media Night, we will be talking about the current status of child welfare workforce in the US. This #MacroSW chat will focus on how those who practice macro social work can empower and impact change to address many of the long standing issues related to our country’s child welfare system and workforce.

imagesPlease read the following statement from the National Association of Social Workers about how to strengthen delivery of services to children and families in the US: NASW’s Advocacy Issues Statement on Child Welfare

This infographic from the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute also provides some back ground information: Why the Workforce Matters

toodsageOur host will be Todd Sage (@socialworksage) who is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of North Dakota. Todd has 10 years of child welfare work experience in three states and is currently the grant coordinator for UND’s National Child Welfare Workforce Initiative (NCWWI) grant. The grants focus is to address training, recruitment and retention of front line child welfare workers.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. In 2014, @NASW reported over 147K children received Foster Care services. What role does #MacroSW play in ensuring appropriate services?
  2.  How can the Macro SW community address large CPS caseloads, employee turnover & caseworkers needing more training to improve outcomes?
  3. Programs are at risk with the appt. of Tom Price as Sec of HHS. @NASW has opposed his appointment. How will you work to protect services?
  4. How would you design a national recruitment campaign to encourage SWKers to go into CW practice?
  5. The Social Work Reinvestment Act has proposed funding and support for SW and CW. How can we get this act passed?
  6. How can #MacroSW address the disproportionality of persons of color in CW?

About #MacroSW Media Nights: Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

About #MacroSW: #MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

Media Night 12/22/16 – Human Investment in #MacroSW Practice

peopleClick here for the Storify transcript from the chat and click here is the Symplur transcript.

For our December Media Night, we will be talking about the video Human Investment which is an educational short video that explores through the use of compelling narrative about what drives dedicated social workers and other professionals to invest themselves in the humanity of care.  This video was created by Sherry Saturno, LCSW, DCSW, who received her MSW from Columbia University. She is a Westchester County District Leader (Tarrytown, NY-Democrat) who works in nursing home administration. She was awarded the NASW Social Worker of the Year for New York State (2012), as well as NASW Westchester County, NY Social Worker of the Year (2010).

typeFor this chat, we will discuss some of the topics raised in this video in the context of macro social work practice, especially how we can invest in ourselves as professionals to improve the lives of our clients and communities.

This video won a 2016 Media Award from National Association of Social Workers (NASW):  http://www.socialworkersspeak.org/hollywood-connection/and-the-2016-nasw-media-award-winners-are.html

Here is a link the video Human Investment which is 22 minutes long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRJs_Cly4Kkv.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. How do macro social workers best contribute to the care of clients – human investment?
  2. What issue from the video was most interesting to you and why?
  3. What are the most pressing issues for today’s macro social workers?
  4. What motivates you to be a social worker and/or practice #MacroSW?
  5. What was the best piece of advice that you learned from this video and why?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 10.27.16 – Inequality for All with Jimmy Young of California State University San Marcos

Here are the transcripts for tonight:

Storify Transcript: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-10-27-16-inequality-for-all-with-jimmy

Symplur Transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=10%2F27%2F2016&shour=17&smin=00&tdate=10%2F27%2F2016&thour=20&tmin=30

For our October Media Night, we will be talking about income inequality in a student-focused #MacroSW chat.  Social work students (and everyone else) from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused chat about income equality. 

Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professors Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) of California State University San Marcos (@csusmnews) will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, October 27th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

jimmyyoungOur host is Dr. Jimmy Young, an Assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at California State University San Marcos. He graduated with his PhD in social work from Virginia Commonwealth University and his MSW & MPA from Eastern Washington University. His main focus is around social work education and nonprofit organizations, and his research is centered on these two areas as they relate to the use of technology and specifically social media.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. See below for information on how to access the movie.
  2. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  3. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social work professor Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) and Laurel Hitchcock on the #MacroSW Official Twitter handle @OfficialMacroSW. Include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.
  4. Following the live chat, your instructor may also ask you to write a brief self-reflection essay about your experience of participating in this event.

The written parts of the assignment are optional and are not required to participate. However, we do encourage you to take some time to reflect upon what you learn from the film and the topics that are discussed in the chat. How might they inform your future social work practice?

To Access the Film: Click on the following link and use the password bernie2016:Inequalityforall

https://vimeo.com/141725998

Inequality for All runs 1 hour and 29 minutes, and is also available for streaming from iTunes and Amazon Prime. You can still request the DVD from Netflix. Alternatively, you can watch this interview between Bill Moyers and Robert Reich discussing the film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-rpkZe2OEo

About the Film: Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film that examines the widening income gap in the United States. Using the stories of real people and real lives, the narrative explores the effects this increasing gap has not only on the U.S. economy but also on democracy itself. Presented by American economist, author and professor Robert Reich, the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking.

Questions for the live chat:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How do we as social workers address inequality or move forward?

If you are an educator wanting to incorporate this chat as an assignment in your class, please click here for details.  We hope you can join us! Please contact Jimmy or Laurel if you plan to have your class or maybe student groups participate in the chat.  They will also welcome your questions.  

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 9.29.16 – Environmental Justice

Here is the transcript for this chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-9-29-16-environmental-justice 

For our September Media Night, we will be talking about environmental justice as an important area of macro social work practice.

environmentaljustice_imageEnvironmental justice gets at the notion that all people have a right to a clean, safe, environment regardless of their race, ethnicity, SES, gender, and no matter where they live. In this chat, we’ll be discussing lead exposure as an environmental justice issue of particular importance to social workers.

Here is a link the article, Freddie Gray’s life a study on the effects of lead paint on poor blacks by Terrence McCoy of the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/freddie-grays-life-a-study-in-the-sad-effects-of-lead-paint-on-poor-blacks/2015/04/29/0be898e6-eea8-11e4-8abc-d6aa3bad79dd_story.html.

samantha-teixeira-513x336Our host will is Dr. Samantha Teixeira from the School of Social Work at Boston College. Samantha Teixeira, PhD, joined the faculty at the School of Social Work in 2015. Her research focuses on how neighborhood environmental conditions affect youth and how youth can be engaged in creating solutions to environmental problems in their communities. In order to better address neighborhood environmental disparities, Dr. Teixeira utilizes a community based participatory research approach to identify community environmental issues and learn how they shape life in disadvantaged neighborhoods, particularly among youth. In her work, she uses innovative, mixed methods approaches including photography, community mapping, in-depth interviews, and spatial analysis to uncover the perspectives of neighborhood residents and intervene in community problems.

She has published on the topics of place-based, comprehensive community interventions that address neighborhood environmental disparities, youth-led participatory research, and environmental justice interventions and education. Samantha’s diverse practice experience includes work in child protective services, community organizing and development, and local government initiatives.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Would you consider lead exposure to be an environmental justice (EJ) issue? Why?
  2. Why is lead exposure an important environmental/contextual consideration when considering the life and death of Freddie Gray?
  3. EJ issues have been called a form of “slow violence” that causes injury more slowly than typical acts of violence. How does slow violence relate to Gray’s Baltimore community?
  4. In the graphic “Baltimore neighborhoods with elevated lead levels” click to see maps illustrating lead levels, vacant property, & child poverty. What do you see here?
  5. This article illustrates many interconnections between micro and macro social work issues. Identify issues at different systems levels and how they interconnect.
  6. The article alludes to the connection between lead exposure and violence. How do you think these issues relate?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

 

Grand Challenges #MacroSW Chat – Social Isolation on 5/12/16

GC_SocialIsolation_Page_01Click here to read the chat transcript.

Join the next in a series of #MacroSW Chats about the Grand Challenges from the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare.  Our chat on Thursday, May 12 at 9:00 PM EST will be co-hosted by  the AASWSW (@AASWSWorg) and Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock), focusing on social isolation.

Social isolation is correlated with an array of negative health outcomes. It can happen at any age but is more common among older adults. Social isolation is a silent killer—as dangerous to health as smoking. According to a 2013 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study, social isolation was associated with a more than 25 percent likelihood of premature death.

Eradicating social isolation represents one of the 12 Grand Challenges for Social Work (GCSW) announced by the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare earlier this year.

Our May 12th Twitter chat will discuss questions related to this critical issue such as:

  1. What are the health and other effects of social isolation?
  2. What are the most important risk factors for social isolation?
  3. What are innovative strategies for reducing social isolation and increasing social engagement?
  4. What is the role of social work in reducing social isolation?

Further reading on Social Isolation

Learn More about the Grand Challenges for Social Work

You can read more about the Grand Challenges and join the initiative at: http://aaswsw.org/grand-challenges-initiative/.

You can also read the blog posts from previous GSCW-themed Twitter chats on:

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Macro Matters: 20% by 2020

By Rachel L. West
ACOSA Board Member

Update: Chat transcript can be found here.

The Special Commission to Advance Macro Practice in Social Work is calling on the CSWE and other social work organizations to make a commitment to macro practice. Current data shows only 9-10% of social work students plan to pursue macro practice. The commission wants to raise that number to 20% by 2020.

As Michael Reisch pointed out in his eloquent essay, macro is an important component of social work practice.

It pushes the boundaries of the profession by fostering a “big picture” perspective that enables social workers and society as a whole to analyze people’s issues “outside the box” and focus on the prevention of problems, not merely their amelioration. Macro practice explicitly embodies social work’s commitment to social justice and social change by promoting structural solutions to systemic inequalities and various forms of oppression that go beyond individual adaptation and resilience.

The Rothman report brought to light serious concerns that if not dealt with endanger the future of macro practice.

On Thursday November 5th #MacroSW Twitter Chats will discuss the work of The Special Commission to Advance Macro Practice in Social Work and the 20% by 2020 initiative. The chat starts at 9:00 PM EST. I will host the chat from @acosaorg account.

Before the chat please read the following:

The Special Commission to Advance Macro Social Work Practice

Why Macro Practice Matters
By Michael Reisch, University of Maryland

NOW! MAKE MACRO MATTER: Taking Further Action to Address the Macro Imbalance in Social Work Education

 Our partners include:

  • Association for Community Organizing and Social Administration (ACOSA), @acosaorg
  • Karen Zgoda, MSW, LCSW, Instructor of Social Work at Bridgewater State University, @karenzgoda
  • Rachel West, The Political Social Worker, @poliSW
  • University at Buffalo School of Social Work, @ubssw
  • Sunya Folayan, MSW, ACSW, founder/executive director, The Empowerment Project, Inc., @SunyaFolayan
  • Laurel Hitchcock, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Alabama at Birmingham,@Laurelhitchcock
  • Kristin Battista-Frazee, MSW, Author and Marketing Consultant, @porndaughter

In addition to the active partners above, founding chat partners include:

Inequality for All: Student-Focused #MacroSW Twitter Chat on 10/8/15

Inequality for all

Here is a link to this chat’s transcript: https://storify.com/laurelhitchcock/macrosw-student-chat-on-income-inequality

Social work students from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused Twitter Chat about income equality.  Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professors Jimmy Young, of the California State University San Marcos, and Laurel Hitchcock, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, October 8th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  2. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social work professors Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) and Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock). Include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.
  3. Following the live chat, your instructor may also ask you to write a brief self-reflection essay about your experience of participating in this event.

The written parts of the assignment are optional and are not required to participate. However, we do encourage you to take some time to reflect upon what you learn from the film and the topics that are discussed in the chat. How might they inform your future social work practice?

About the Film:  Inequality for All

Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film that examines the widening income gap in the United States. Using the stories of real people and real lives, the narrative explores the effects this increasing gap has not only on the U.S. economy but also on democracy itself. Presented by American economist, author and professor Robert Reich, the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking. Inequality for All runs 1 hour and 29 minutes and the full film can be found on inequalityforall.com.

Update: 

It seems the film is no longer streaming on Netflix, but streaming is available from iTunes and Amazon Prime. You can still request the DVD from Netflix. Alternatively, you can watch this interview between Bill Moyers and Robert Reich discussing the film:
Questions to Consider

When writing your reaction to the film, consider the following questions:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How do we as social workers address inequality or move forward?

 About us:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held bimonthly on Twitter on the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). For more information, chat schedule, and chat archives check out: https://macrosw.wordpress.com.

Our collaborators include:

  • Association for Community Organizing and Social Administration (ACOSA), @acosaorg
  • Karen Zgoda, MSW, LCSW, Instructor of Social Work at Bridgewater State University, @karenzgoda
  • Rachel West, The Political Social Worker, @poliSW
  • University at Buffalo School of Social Work, @ubssw
  • Sunya Folayan, MSW, ACSW, founder/executive director, The Empowerment Project, Inc., @SunyaFolayan
  • Laurel Hitchcock, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Alabama at Birmingham,@Laurelhitchcock
  • Kristin Battista-Frazee, MSW, Author and Marketing Consultant, @porndaughter

We wish to acknowledge the contribution of our founding members, the University of Southern California School of Social Work and Network for Social Work Management (NSWM), who were participants during our first year of chats.

Open Mic Night! #MacroSW Chat July 23 at 9pm EST

Update: Chat archive available here! Also our no topic topic generated a large summer media list you might enjoy:


IMG_0390Join host @karenzgoda and the #MacroSW crew on the eve of our annual Summer vacation for an hour of YOUR issues, comments and ideas for future chats on Thursday, July 23rd at 9 pm ET / 8pm CT / 6pm PT! We’ll take a break for the month of August (no chats). Then we return to our regular schedule of chats on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month.

Fall Schedule Highlights:

  • 9/10/2015 Host: Pat Shelly/UB Topic: Trauma-informed care What is Trauma-Informed Care and Why is Social Work adopting it as a Best Practice? @UBSSW faculty Sue Green and Tom Nochajski, Directors of the Institute on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care ( ITTIC – http://bit.ly/1HJ3356 ) will be the resident experts for this chat, on the eve of the 14th anniversary of 9-11. There has been a great leap forward in the research on trauma, the ubiquity of Adverse Childhood Experiences ( ACEs – http://bit.ly/1LtGFAX ) and the benefits and best practices of trauma-informed care.
  • 9/24/2015 Host: TBA Topic: TBA 10/8/2015 Host: Laurel Hitchcock & Jimmy Young Topic: Inequality for All Film Discussion ABOUT #MACROSW

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held bimonthly on Twitter on the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). For more information, chat schedule, and chat archives check out: https://macrosw.wordpress.com Our collaborators include:

  • Association for Community Organizing and Social Administration (ACOSA), @acosaorg
  • Karen Zgoda, MSW, LCSW, Instructor of Social Work at Bridgewater State University, @karenzgoda
  • Network for Social Work Management (NSWM), @TheNSWM
  • Rachel West, The Political Social Worker, @poliSW
  • University at Buffalo School of Social Work, @ubssw
  • Sunya Folayan, MSW, ACSW, founder/executive director, The Empowerment Project, Inc., @SunyaFolayan
  • Laurel Hitchcock, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Alabama at Birmingham,@Laurelhitchcock
  • Kristin Battista-Frazee, MSW, Author and Marketing Consultant, @porndaughter

We wish to acknowledge the contribution of one of our founding members, the University of Southern California School of Social Work, who was a participant during our first year of chats.