What’s Next after the Affordable Care Act? 2-16-2017 #MacroSW chat

Hospital lobby escalatorOne of the signature pieces of legislation during the Obama administration was passage of the Affordable Care Act. The ACA weathered many attempts to be derailed throughout the remainder of President Obama’s term, with dozens of votes to repeal the act held in the House. In 2010, after the Supreme Court upheld the law, it seemed Obamacare was positioned to remain in place.

While the ACA has been considered flawed, even by its strongest proponents, the law enacted a series of changes to health care access. These changes expanded health care to millions of people. These changes included:

Removing provisions allowing health care insurers to deny coverage based on pre-existing conditions;
Creating health care insurance marketplaces that allowed people without employer’s insurance to purchase health insurance coverage;
Providing subsidies to assist people in need in paying for health care insurance;
Allowing young adults to remain on their parents’ insurance until age 26

Now, with a new administration, the ACA is facing a critical crossroads. While President Trump campaigned on a platform to repeal the act and replacing it, it remains unclear what these changes will look like, and when these changes may occur. While some proposals have been offered, the law in its current form remains in place. Meanwhile, as the current congress deliberates on what changes should occur, public opinion on the ACA law has reached a new high in popularity.

Social workers in clinical, inpatient care, and policy settings have had an emerging leadership role with the ACA. Now, our profession looks to ensure that gains made for individuals and their families are not lost and promoting ways to improve access to healthcare in the United States.

Here are some questions we will discuss this week:

How has the ACA changed health care access for you, your clients or communities?
What do you think will happen if the ACA is repealed?
What do you think could be done to improve the ACA?
What do you think is the most common misunderstanding about the ACA? Why?
How should social workers respond to the possible repeal of the ACA?

Resources:

As GOP pushes repeal, Obamacare has never been more popular: NBC News/WSJ Poll (NBC News): http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/first-read/brink-repeal-obamacare-has-never-been-more-popular-n707806

How repealing portions of the Affordable Care Act would affect health insurance coverage and premiums (Congressional Budget Office Report): https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/reports/52371-coverageandpremiums.pdf

Issue: Ensure that social workers are frontline health providers to effect Affordable Care Act integration (NASW): https://www.socialworkers.org/advocacy/documents/PP-FL-19716.IssueBrief-ACA-NC.pdf

The Opioid Crisis 02-09-17 #MacroSW Chat

Map of USA overlaid with text "91 Americans die every day from opioid overdose (that includes prescription opioids and heroin).
Image: CDC  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the archive of this twitter chat.

Why do social workers need to know about the opioid epidemic?

  • Opioid dependence is an epidemic in the United States.
  • Many social workers are interested in addictions.
  • We will see opioid dependence regardless of where we practice social work.
  • It is important that all of us know more about this issue.

Join us on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 9 pm EST, 8 pm CST, and 6 pm PST as we look at the epidemic of overdose deaths in the U.S. caused by use of opioids. We’ll discuss current stats, contributing factors, and evidence-based treatment and prevention practices. The host is Pat Shelly from @UBSSW – she’ll be on the @OfficialMacroSW handle.

Our guest expert is Charles Syms, from the School of Social Work at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, using the @UBSSW handle.

Photo of Charles Syms, African American man,standing wiih arms crossed over chest, smiling, wearing white shirt, yellow tie, and eyeglasses.
Charles Syms, LCSW, ACSW

 

Charles Syms, LCSW/ACSW, is a clinical associate professor who has been a faculty member in the University at Buffalo’s School of Social Work since 1998. A past National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) Minority Research Fellow, Professor Syms’s current teaching and research interests include the treatment of individuals with substance use disorders, particularly the impact of alcohol and other drugs on people with mental health problems and those involved with child welfare system. He works to extend this education into the on-line environment.

Professor Syms has over 35 years of professional social work practice. He received his MSW in 1979 from California State University – Sacramento. His experience includes work in child welfare, domestic violence, forensic mental health and substance use disorders. He has held numerous positions, including child protection worker, child protection clinical consultant, prison psychiatric social worker, supervisor on an in-patient chemical dependency unit, domestic violence specialist and group leader, child welfare program director, and a leadership role in coordinating two community-based, university/public school collaborative violence prevention projects. Additionally, Professor Syms shares his experience and expertise as a member of agency-based and professional advisory boards at the local, state and national levels.

Here are some questions we will discuss this week:

  1. Just how widespread is the opioid epidemic?
  2. Why is it worse in the United States than elsewhere?
  3. What are the evidence-based practices that are effective in treating opioid dependence?
  4. Are there preferred prevention models?
  5. What implications for policy does Carl Hart’s talk, “Let’s quit abusing drug abusers,” offer?
  6. What are social workers doing at the macro level regarding this epidemic?

Resources:

“Let’s quit abusing drug abusers” by Carl Hart (19 min. video) http://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=309156

Understanding the epidemic: https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/epidemic/

Treatment Overview:  https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/effective-treatments-opioid-addiction/effective-treatments-opioid-addiction

Prevention: The IPP model.  https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/opioids/odprevention.html

Safe injection spaces: http://www.drugpolicy.org/news/2015/08/tuesday-new-film-documents-public-injection-drug-use-new-york-calls-supervised-injectio

Inside North America’s Only Legal Safe Injection Facility:  http://bit.ly/2ke4B1h
Look for the archive of all tweets from this chat that will be posted the following day on February 10.

 

New to Twitter chats? Here is a great guide: “How to Participate in a Live Twitter Chat – Tips for Social Workers” by our partner, Laurel Iverson Hitchcock.

About #MacroSW:
#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

-Click here for a list of chat partners.

-For the #MacroSW Chat Schedule, Recent Posts, and all chat Archives – See the column on the right side of our home page: http://macrosw.com

 

Media Night 01/26/2017 – Status of Child Welfare Workforce in US

Here is the transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=01%2F26%2F2017&shour=17&smin=30&tdate=01%2F26%2F2017&thour=19&tmin=30

For our January Media Night, we will be talking about the current status of child welfare workforce in the US. This #MacroSW chat will focus on how those who practice macro social work can empower and impact change to address many of the long standing issues related to our country’s child welfare system and workforce.

imagesPlease read the following statement from the National Association of Social Workers about how to strengthen delivery of services to children and families in the US: NASW’s Advocacy Issues Statement on Child Welfare

This infographic from the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute also provides some back ground information: Why the Workforce Matters

toodsageOur host will be Todd Sage (@socialworksage) who is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of North Dakota. Todd has 10 years of child welfare work experience in three states and is currently the grant coordinator for UND’s National Child Welfare Workforce Initiative (NCWWI) grant. The grants focus is to address training, recruitment and retention of front line child welfare workers.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. In 2014, @NASW reported over 147K children received Foster Care services. What role does #MacroSW play in ensuring appropriate services?
  2.  How can the Macro SW community address large CPS caseloads, employee turnover & caseworkers needing more training to improve outcomes?
  3. Programs are at risk with the appt. of Tom Price as Sec of HHS. @NASW has opposed his appointment. How will you work to protect services?
  4. How would you design a national recruitment campaign to encourage SWKers to go into CW practice?
  5. The Social Work Reinvestment Act has proposed funding and support for SW and CW. How can we get this act passed?
  6. How can #MacroSW address the disproportionality of persons of color in CW?

About #MacroSW Media Nights: Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

About #MacroSW: #MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

Advocating for Macro Social Work: ACOSA turns 30 in 2017!

Thursday December 15th is ACOSA night at #MacroSW Twitter Chats

Chat Transcript 

By Rachel L. West
ACOSA Board Member

The Association for Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA) is a membership organization for community organizers, activists, field instructors, community builders, policy practitioners, students, and educators. Since its formation in 1987, it has promoted teaching, research, and social work in the area of community practice by accomplishing the following:

  • Hosting a website for community practice curriculum material, event announcements, Special Commission resources; actions from the field, and student viewpoints;
  • Establishing and operating the Journal of Community Practice;
  • Soliciting and reviewing proposals for the community practice track at CSWE’s Annual Program Meeting;
  • Recognizing emerging scholars, contributions to the field, and lifetime achievement in community practice with its awards; and
  • Supporting the establishment of Macro Social Work Student Network chapters.

The Special Commission to Advance Macro Practice in Social Work (SC) was formed in 2013 to address the low percent of all MSW students enrolled a macro concentration/specialization, and limited macro content in many BSW and MSW programs. “20 in 2020” is one of the initiates undertaken by the commission. The goal is to have enrollment in a macro concentration or method up to 20% of all social work graduate students country-wide by the year 2020. SC has now partnered with ACOSA; SC materials are posted on the ACOSA website.

As part of its 30th anniversary, ACOSA will be conducting a strategic visioning session in June. This chat will give you the opportunity to learn more about ACOSA and the Special Commission and contribute your ideas to how this professional association might lead in the future.

The Chat starts at 9:00 PM EST/6:00 PM PST. I will be hosting (@poliSW) and will be joined by incoming ACOSA Chair Rebecca Sanders.

Questions:

  1. What concerns do you have about the current state of social work macro practice?
  2. What can be done to strengthen macro practice?
  3. Are you a member of ACOSA? If not, why not? What would draw you in?
  4. Were you aware of the Special Commission? Have you seen the materials it has produced?
  5. Looking ahead, what should be ACOSA’s top priorities?

Resources:

The ACOSA website

A #PoliticsNOW #MacroSW Chat – 10/20/16

blues poster with word select in white, and the word "elect" in parentheses. One can read it as SELECT or ELECT.
poster: AIGA the professional association for design

Join Kristin Battista-Frazee for this chat on action leading up to the November 8th elections. What’s happening your area? What is the social work profession doing to inform our constituencies (everyone, that is!) on issues, voting rights, and more?

9PM EST/ 8 PM CT/ 6 PM PT

Resources:

A Dream Undone: Disenfranchised
Rutenberg, J. (2015, July 29). A Dream Undone: Disenfranchised. The New York Times Magazine, p MM 30. Retrieved from  http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/29/magazine/voting-rights-act-dream-undone.html *

The Nancy A. Humphreys Institute for Political Social Work says: “Every social worker should read this article on the history of the voting rights act and the decades long (sic) efforts to undo it.”

Wilson, M.H. (2016 ). Social Justice Brief (Voting Rights Update). Washington, D.C.: National Association of Social Workers.

 


 

Media Night 9.29.16 – Environmental Justice

Here is the transcript for this chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-9-29-16-environmental-justice 

For our September Media Night, we will be talking about environmental justice as an important area of macro social work practice.

environmentaljustice_imageEnvironmental justice gets at the notion that all people have a right to a clean, safe, environment regardless of their race, ethnicity, SES, gender, and no matter where they live. In this chat, we’ll be discussing lead exposure as an environmental justice issue of particular importance to social workers.

Here is a link the article, Freddie Gray’s life a study on the effects of lead paint on poor blacks by Terrence McCoy of the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/freddie-grays-life-a-study-in-the-sad-effects-of-lead-paint-on-poor-blacks/2015/04/29/0be898e6-eea8-11e4-8abc-d6aa3bad79dd_story.html.

samantha-teixeira-513x336Our host will is Dr. Samantha Teixeira from the School of Social Work at Boston College. Samantha Teixeira, PhD, joined the faculty at the School of Social Work in 2015. Her research focuses on how neighborhood environmental conditions affect youth and how youth can be engaged in creating solutions to environmental problems in their communities. In order to better address neighborhood environmental disparities, Dr. Teixeira utilizes a community based participatory research approach to identify community environmental issues and learn how they shape life in disadvantaged neighborhoods, particularly among youth. In her work, she uses innovative, mixed methods approaches including photography, community mapping, in-depth interviews, and spatial analysis to uncover the perspectives of neighborhood residents and intervene in community problems.

She has published on the topics of place-based, comprehensive community interventions that address neighborhood environmental disparities, youth-led participatory research, and environmental justice interventions and education. Samantha’s diverse practice experience includes work in child protective services, community organizing and development, and local government initiatives.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Would you consider lead exposure to be an environmental justice (EJ) issue? Why?
  2. Why is lead exposure an important environmental/contextual consideration when considering the life and death of Freddie Gray?
  3. EJ issues have been called a form of “slow violence” that causes injury more slowly than typical acts of violence. How does slow violence relate to Gray’s Baltimore community?
  4. In the graphic “Baltimore neighborhoods with elevated lead levels” click to see maps illustrating lead levels, vacant property, & child poverty. What do you see here?
  5. This article illustrates many interconnections between micro and macro social work issues. Identify issues at different systems levels and how they interconnect.
  6. The article alludes to the connection between lead exposure and violence. How do you think these issues relate?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

 

Toxic Masculinity is a Macro Social Work Issue

Chat archive now available!

 

instagram-9-15-16-toxicmasculinity

 

 

youtube-logo

 

Here’s a link to the trailer for “The Mask You Live In.”  This documentary on the American “boy crisis” explains how to raise a healthier generation of men and features interviews with experts and academics. What does it mean to be a man? American society might be pushing a masculinity on our boys that destroys them.

 

 

netflix-logo

The 91 minute film is available for viewing on Netflix.

 

Community Building/Self Care for Social Workers in Today’s Complex Times

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(The archive of this chat can be found here.)

 

Many are drawn to the profession of social work because they want to help others, contribute to problems at every level of human interaction, and create lasting societal  change. Newly minted professionals and seasoned veterans in all practice settings give great time, service and energy  in commitment to the betterment of our society. Most social workers routinely encourage clients to set interpersonal boundaries,  tend to their needs and pay attention to the consequences of not doing so.  Unfortunately, in our zeal to do our work well, we may find ourselves caring for others while neglecting care for ourselves. The cost of self-neglect can present as ongoing, relentless stress, that can siphon away one’s overall health and well-being,  show up as compassion fatigue and even result in burn out so severe that we may find ourselves walking away from the field of work we love. Today’s clients present with multi-layered problems requiring skilled navigation through social systems that are often obsolete and ineffective. Social workers are often asked to do more with less. The results can be disastrous with personal and professional consequences.

The social work community has begun to come together to identify the obstacles to self care, assess the high cost of neglect, and has begun to develop a culture of self care, that was not present in years past. Increasingly, as a profession, the need for self-care is being recognized as necessary and  a fundamental professional competency worthy of training, research and resource development.

Questions for discussion:

  • How do you define self-care?
  • How can we develop a strong community of support in creating addressing self care in our work?
  • What personal tips can you share for self care this season?
  • What are the obstacles to self care in light of today’s professional challenges
  • in social work?
  • What are the consequences of putting our client’s (and agency’s) needs above our own?
  • What resources do you use in creating a self-care plan?
  • How do you discuss self care with your students?
  • What have you incorporated into your self care that you have added since last year?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Mic/Summer Self-Care Forum 7-28-2016

 

Once again, we reach that time of year when  #MacroSW chat will take a moment to have an open mic session as friends, colleagues and students to talk about what’s most important in our profession as social workers and allied colleagues. The topic? Whatever we please! While we are at it, let’s all share best self-care practices that have been helpful for the summer season and during this tumultuous season of change. Share what you have tucked away in your beach bag, favorite summer comfort foods, music selections, best summer beverage selections, as well as “staycation”, sabbatical and or travel plans. Bring your best memes and gifs suitable for the occasion.

MacroSW will break for the month of August resuming  Thursday, September, 8, 2016.

 

#MacroSW Media Night 6/30/16 – Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA

Click here for a copy of the chat transcript.

downloadFor our June Media Night, we will be watching Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA produced by Frontline.  Here is the description of the movie:

In Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA, FRONTLINE goes inside the politics of America’s gun debate. Veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk investigates the NRA, its political evolution and influence, and how it has consistently succeeded in defeating new gun control legislation.

Here is a link the movie (54 minutes): http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/gunned-down/.  You can watch the movie for free.  

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the special interests influencing the gun debate in America? #MacroSW
  2. How are current gun policies affecting your community? And the individuals & families who live in your community? #MacroSW
  3. How can we start talking about gun policies in America in more inclusive way; with less divisiveness? #MacroSW
  4. How do our professional ethics guide social workers in responding to the gun debate? #MacroSW
  5. What lessons about lobbying have you learned that can be applied to #MacroSW?
  6. What single word best describes how the film made you feel? #MacroSW
  7. What’s next? How do we as social workers promote practical solutions to the gun debates in America? #MacroSW

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com