The Opioid Crisis 02-09-17 #MacroSW Chat

Map of USA overlaid with text "91 Americans die every day from opioid overdose (that includes prescription opioids and heroin).
Image: CDC  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the archive of this twitter chat.

Why do social workers need to know about the opioid epidemic?

  • Opioid dependence is an epidemic in the United States.
  • Many social workers are interested in addictions.
  • We will see opioid dependence regardless of where we practice social work.
  • It is important that all of us know more about this issue.

Join us on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 9 pm EST, 8 pm CST, and 6 pm PST as we look at the epidemic of overdose deaths in the U.S. caused by use of opioids. We’ll discuss current stats, contributing factors, and evidence-based treatment and prevention practices. The host is Pat Shelly from @UBSSW – she’ll be on the @OfficialMacroSW handle.

Our guest expert is Charles Syms, from the School of Social Work at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, using the @UBSSW handle.

Photo of Charles Syms, African American man,standing wiih arms crossed over chest, smiling, wearing white shirt, yellow tie, and eyeglasses.
Charles Syms, LCSW, ACSW

 

Charles Syms, LCSW/ACSW, is a clinical associate professor who has been a faculty member in the University at Buffalo’s School of Social Work since 1998. A past National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) Minority Research Fellow, Professor Syms’s current teaching and research interests include the treatment of individuals with substance use disorders, particularly the impact of alcohol and other drugs on people with mental health problems and those involved with child welfare system. He works to extend this education into the on-line environment.

Professor Syms has over 35 years of professional social work practice. He received his MSW in 1979 from California State University – Sacramento. His experience includes work in child welfare, domestic violence, forensic mental health and substance use disorders. He has held numerous positions, including child protection worker, child protection clinical consultant, prison psychiatric social worker, supervisor on an in-patient chemical dependency unit, domestic violence specialist and group leader, child welfare program director, and a leadership role in coordinating two community-based, university/public school collaborative violence prevention projects. Additionally, Professor Syms shares his experience and expertise as a member of agency-based and professional advisory boards at the local, state and national levels.

Here are some questions we will discuss this week:

  1. Just how widespread is the opioid epidemic?
  2. Why is it worse in the United States than elsewhere?
  3. What are the evidence-based practices that are effective in treating opioid dependence?
  4. Are there preferred prevention models?
  5. What implications for policy does Carl Hart’s talk, “Let’s quit abusing drug abusers,” offer?
  6. What are social workers doing at the macro level regarding this epidemic?

Resources:

“Let’s quit abusing drug abusers” by Carl Hart (19 min. video) http://www.tedmed.com/talks/show?id=309156

Understanding the epidemic: https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/epidemic/

Treatment Overview:  https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/effective-treatments-opioid-addiction/effective-treatments-opioid-addiction

Prevention: The IPP model.  https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/opioids/odprevention.html

Safe injection spaces: http://www.drugpolicy.org/news/2015/08/tuesday-new-film-documents-public-injection-drug-use-new-york-calls-supervised-injectio

Inside North America’s Only Legal Safe Injection Facility:  http://bit.ly/2ke4B1h
Look for the archive of all tweets from this chat that will be posted the following day on February 10.

 

New to Twitter chats? Here is a great guide: “How to Participate in a Live Twitter Chat – Tips for Social Workers” by our partner, Laurel Iverson Hitchcock.

About #MacroSW:
#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

-Click here for a list of chat partners.

-For the #MacroSW Chat Schedule, Recent Posts, and all chat Archives – See the column on the right side of our home page: http://macrosw.com

 

Surviving & Thriving Over the Holidays: #MacroSW 12/8 at 9pm EST

holiday-checklist
Image source.

Chat archive available here!

For a variety of reasons, the holidays can be filled with multiple sources of stress. Let’s chat about holiday self-care and bring back some joy to the holiday season!

 

Chat Questions:

  1. How is your holiday season going?
  2. What do you wish others knew about your holiday stressors?
  3. What are you grateful for this holiday season?
  4. What are you hopeful for in the coming year?

Chat Resources:

#MacroSW Chat – Nov. 10, 2016: It’s the Post-Election Detox / What’s On Your Mind / Fall & Winter Holidays are Coming OPEN MIC!

A swirling spiral of red and blue lines with people swept along it, leading to a ballot box.
Image: Stephen Savage for the NY Times

 

Here’s the archive of this chat.

Results are in; the winner of the US Presidential Election has been announced. The #MacroSW partners want to let everyone know that we will not assume we know how our colleagues / students / chat participants voted. #MacroSW chat will remain non-partisan in our role as the facilitator of these gloriously wide-ranging, informative, and stimulating chats. We plan on this chat being- as we hope all our chats are – trauma-informed.*  We do expect people to be expressing feelings and opinions, with comments made in a safe and respectful way in line with the Code of Ethics and the history of macro social work.** Host Pat Shelly from @UBSSW will be using the @officialmacrosw handle to further align in a neutral position.

Votes will be in and counted; the political ads will disappear.  How will you recover from this election season? Or do you want to talk about ANYTHING BUT the impact of the election?

Join us for this open mic:

  • What’s on your mind?
  • Regaining a sense of sanity after the 2016 U.S. elections.
  • Oh how those Thanksgiving and December holidays loom!!

Host: Pat Shelly @UBSSW University at Buffalo School of Social Work

We hope to have some fun, and offer ideas and resources for election season recovery! And – in case you are worried that your stress level will get too low –  we might talk about how to prepare for the November/December holidays and the often fraught family time they engender. The open mic means you can introduce whatever else is on your mind.
*6 Key Principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach:

  1. Safety;
  2. Trustworthiness and Transparency;
  3. Peer support;
  4. Collaboration and mutuality;
  5. Empowerment, voice and choice;
  6. Cultural, Historical, and Gender Issues

** “Macro social work practice includes those activities performed in organizational, community, and policy arenas. Macro practice has a diverse history that reveals conflicting ideologies and multiple theoretical perspectives (emphasis added).Programmatic, organizational, community, and policy dimensions of macro practice underscore the social work profession’s emphasis on using a person-in-environment perspective. Thus, social workers, regardless of roles played, are expected to have sensitivity toward and engage in macro practice activities.”

Netting. F.E. (2013). Macro Social Work Practice in Encyclopedia of Social Work 20th Edition. Retrieved from http://socialwork.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199975839.001.0001/acrefore-9780199975839-e-230


Resources:

To put things in perspective, here’s a satirical piece from the digital humor magazine The Onion:
ELECTION 2016: Nation Admits It’s Probably Going to Come Out of This Having Learned the Completely Wrong Lesson

And some bona fide research:

These elections are having an impact on the nation’s mental health:
Talking to Your Therapist About Election Anxiety : “‘I’ve been in private practice for 30 years, and I have never seen patients have such strong reactions to an election,’ said Sue Elias, a licensed clinical social worker in Manhattan.”

A report by the American Psychological Society shows that the 2016 elections were a source of  stress for 52% of Americans surveyed:
Stress in America: U.S. Presidential Election 2016

 

 

 

 

Breaking Down Advocacy Silos to Strengthen Macro-Level Change

Read the chat summary on Storify here.

Social Workers & Community Psychologists, Allies from Intersecting Domains

With pressing social issues and conflicts around the globe regularly calling out for intelligent, effective, and compassion solutions, the need for greater cooperation among diverse disciplines in the fields of community-related work is stronger now more than ever. Fostering interdisciplinary collaborations can go a long way in creating the macro-level societal change that impacts those issues. But as can be the case in academic fields of discourse, professionals hunker down in their “advocacy silos” (in the scientific professional, this can be called “stovepiping”) not aware of the larger context of other related fields and their resources, their interdependent relationships, and the great potential for healthful, societally beneficial collaboration.

Two fields in particular — community psychology and macro social work — share overlapping values and each field has unique talents and resources that they can share. How are the practices of macro social work and community psychology similar yet distinct? What can social workers and community psychologists do to collaborate for macro-level social change? Join us for a Twitter chat on Thursday, July 21, 9-10 p.m. EDT, for a discussion on these and other questions and related topics, including sharing of resources, practices, and research across these disciplines that are at the intersection of social change and working toward greater community well-being.

Hosts

Rachel L. West (@poliSW), L.M.S.W., Advocacy & Community Outreach Consultant, ACOSA (@acosaorg) Board Member, & Instructor at Stony Brook University-School of Social Welfare

Peter Charles Benedict, M.A. (@petebenedict), Outreach and Communications Specialist, Society for Community Research and Action (@scra)

Taylor Scott (@jtaybscott), Administrative Coordinator, Society for Community Research and Action

Special Guests

Jean Hill , Ph.D. (@jeanhillnm), SCRA Past President, and Director of Institutional Research, New Mexico Highlands University

James R. Cook, Ph.D. (@jimcookuncc), SCRA Past President, and Professor of Psychology, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Questions we will consider in this twitter chat

— What is community psychology and how is it distinct yet similar to social work?

— What are the primary goals and motivations of community psychology?

— What resources (practices, research, etc.) does community psychology offer?

— What resources does macro social work offer?

— What questions do you have about either community psychology or macro social work?

— How can social workers and community psychologists better work together to share resources and collaborate?

— What were some good collaborations you were a part of, and what were the benefits?

— What types of circumstances have you found yourself in that would have benefited from a collaboration, and if it didn’t happen, then why not?

Resources

What is Community Psychology?

Check out a brief VIDEO that describes community psychology. You can find additional information on the website for the Society for Community Research and Action (SCRA), which describes CP research, training programs, and includes information on and relevant resources. Also find SCRA on Twitter (@scra), Facebook, and LinkedIn.

What is Macro Social Work?

The Association for Community Organization and Social Administration

The Society for Community Research and Action (@scra), a division of the American Psychological Association, is an 1,100-member professional organization devoted to advancing community research and social action, and it also serves and supports many different disciplines engaged in community work. SCRA members are committed to promoting health and empowerment and to preventing problems in communities, groups, and individuals. SCRA’s vision is to have a strong, global impact on enhancing well-being and promoting social justice for all people by fostering collaboration where there is division and empowerment where there is oppression. Learn more at scra27.org.

A Personal Brand is Not Just for Rock Stars but Social Workers Too

unnamedHere’s the chat archive link.

Developing a personal brand is not just for actors, rock stars, and tech entrepreneurs but for social workers too. As you prepare for graduation or the next step in your career, a strong brand can help you find great opportunities.  How you portray your work and the issues you care about to the outside world shapes your career and reputation. Also, when social workers clearly articulate their skills and capabilities it can define roles for us in different job settings and change the perception of our profession.

Creating a brand unique to you is about authentically sharing your strengths and passions and leveraging different outlets and venues to talk about your expertise.  For this chat we’ll explore the following questions.

  1. What does personal branding mean to you?
  2. How do you get started in shaping your personal brand?
  3. What are the core things you need to develop your personal brand?
  4. How do you clarify your goals, find an audience, and stand out in a crowd?
  5. If you dislike self-promotion, how do you communication your brand?
  6. What are some strategies for promoting yourself and your skills?

Resources

Your Social Work Brand Series by Kristin Battista-Frazee on The New Social Worker Magazine, #MacroSW’s Media Partner

PWC, Personal Branding Workbook

PWC, Elevator Pitch Videos

12 Tips for a Winning Elevator Pitch, Business Daily News,

How to Use LinkedIn: 35 LinkedIn Tips for Professional Networking, Business & Marketing, Hubspot

The Authentic Person’s Guide to Self-Branding, Fast Company

3 Brilliant LinkedIn Summaries that Will Inspire You to Update Yours, Mashable

Kristin’s Pinterest Board about Personal Branding

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

 

Get Out the Vote

An edited chat transcript for this chat can be found here.

By Rachel L. West, LMSW

With the general election just seven months I thought it would be a good idea to explore the role social workers can play in voter outreach.

The NASW Code of Ethics states that:

Social workers should facilitate informed participation by the public in shaping social policies and institutions.

This Thursday’s chat will focus on Getting out the vote. We will cover voter education and voter registration. This includes a discussion of barriers faced by oppressed populations.

In addition to using the #MacroSW hashtag we will also be using #PoliticsNow tag. The chat starts at 9:00 PM EDT / 6:00 PM PDT.

Resources:

Video: How to Register People at a Clinic or Anywhere

DEFENDING DEMOCRACY: CONFRONTING MODERN BARRIERS TO VOTING RIGHTS IN AMERICA

Questions:

Q1: Those of you who have attempted to register clients what have you experienced? ie: what barriers from administration have you encountered? What was the response from clients?

Q2: For those of you who have advocated for voter registration in the work place, what was the argument you made?

Q3: Have/do you work at an organization that provides voter education; such as a voter’s guide or meet the candidate’s event.

Q4: What are some barriers to voting that the communities we serve might face?

Q4a: As social workers, what methods can we use to decrease/eradicate these barriers?

Links to State Board of Elections:

Alabama Louisiana Ohio
Alaska Maine Oklahoma
Arizona Maryland Oregon
Arkansas Massachusetts Pennsylvania
California Michigan Rhode Island
Colorado Minnesota South Carolina
Connecticut Mississippi South Dakota
Delaware Missouri Tennessee
Florida Montana Texas
Georgia Nebraska Utah
Hawaii Nevada Vermont
Idaho New Hampshire Virginia
Illinois New Jersey Washington
Indiana New Mexico West Virginia
Iowa New York Wisconsin
Kansas North Carolina Wyoming
Kentucky North Dakota

 

Photo Credit: Joebeone at the English language Wikipedia [CC BY 2.5 , GFDL  or CC-BY-SA-3.0 ], from Wikimedia Commons

#MacroSW chat 4-14-16: Smart Decarceration and Social Work

An edited version of the chat held April 14th can be found here.

New content in this post added after the chat:
Below the sources listed in this post, there are the additional resources that were tweeted during the chat.

On April 14 the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW) – @AASWSWorg and Pat Shelly – @UBSSW will co-host the #MacroSW Twitter Chat about smart decarceration, one of the Grand Challenges for Social Work.

smart decarceration report AASWSW

Smart decarceration is a response to failed mass incarceration and rehabilitation policies, which have contributed to the United States holding 25% of the global prison population.

smart decarceration image of prison walkway with cells bars
image: DUSTIN HOLMES | FLICKR

According to the White House, between 1988 and 2009, annual state corrections spending increased from $12 billion to $52 billion. Since 77% of prisoners are rearrested within five years of release, implementing effective reentry models can dramatically improve outcomes.

What are the Grand Challenges for Social Work?

GRANDchallenges logo

Led by the AASWSW , the Grand Challenges for Social Work is a groundbreaking initiative to champion social progress powered by science. It is a call to action for social work researchers and practitioners to:

  • Harness social work’s science and knowledge base
  • Collaborate with individuals, community-based organizations, and professionals from all fields and disciplines
  • Partner to tackle some of our toughest social problems

We will address the following questions about smart decarceration:

  1. What have been the effects of mass incarceration?
  2. What are alternatives to mass incarceration?
  3. What successful prison reentry models have you seen?
  4. How do we move from mass incarceration to smart decarceration?

Please follow and use the hashtag #MacroSW on Thursday, April 14 at 9:00 p.m EDT.

Sources:(new ones from chat participants added below these original sources)

Here is a link to the Grand Challenge, Promote Smart Decarceration – at this link, click on the cover of the AASWSW Grand Challenges paper, “From Mass Incarceration to Smart Decarceration” to download a copy.

Links for the report’s authors:
Dr. Carrie Pettus-Davis bio
Assistant Professor and Director, Concordance Institute for Advancing Social Justice, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis

Matthew W. Epperson bio
Assistant Professor, School of Social Service Administration, The University of Chicago

Related articles:

Breaking the cycle of drug use

Alternatives to incarceration

Additional Resources on Smart Decarceration tweeted during chat on 4-14-16

Michelle Alexander on The New Jim Crow (Bill Moyers interviews Alexander in 2010): https://vimeo.com/40261507

The New Jim Crow in the 02-19-13 article by John Light  http://billmoyers.com/2013/02/19/mass-incarceration-and-the-new-jim-crow/

Prison Policy Initiative http://www.prisonpolicy.org
Winnable criminal justice reforms: A Prison Policy Initiative briefing on promising state reform issues for 2016
Link to download this report::
http://www.prisonpolicy.org/searchresults.html?cx=015684313971992382479%3Aa3be84yykbq&cof=FORID%3A11&q=winnable

Prisons for Profit article:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/04/28/how-for-profit-prisons-have-become-the-biggest-lobby-no-one-is-talking-about/

Video: War on Drugs & Mass Incarceration “The House I Live In” http://www.thehouseilivein.org/

Transgender People in Prison Article
Prison is horrifying for transgender people. It’s hell.
http://www.vox.com/2016/4/11/11355702/prison-transgender

Combatting Mass Incarceration ACLU infographic (2011)
https://www.aclu.org/infographic-combating-mass-incarceration-facts

6,000 drug offenders to be released from federal prison starting Friday. (Oct. 2015)
http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-prison-release-20151029-story.html

Blog post on Prison Reform by @StuckOnSocialWork:
THE Question When It comes to #justice and #prison #reform.
https://stuckonsocialwork.wordpress.com/2014/05/07/the-question-when-it-comes-to-justice-and-prison-reform/    also: https://stuckonsocialwork.wordpress.com/2015/03/05/empathy-not-expulsion-for-all-students/

Univ. of Chicago Smart Decarceration Initiative: Reversing Mass Incarceration in America http://ssascholars.uchicago.edu/smart-decarceration-initiative

Creating trauma-informed correctional care: a balance of goals and environment. Niki A. Miller and Lisa M. Najavits 2012
http://www.ejpt.net/index.php/ejpt/article/view/17246

Effective reentry:
4 Elements of Successful Reentry Programs for Inmates
http://www.socialsolutions.com/blog/4-elements-of-successful-reentry-programs-for-inmates/

Center for Employment Opportunities 2013 Annual Report
http://ceoworks.org/about/annual-reports/

Preventing Future Crime With Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
http://www.nij.gov/journals/265/pages/therapy.aspx

HIPAA compliant technology:
VSee – Word’s Largest VideoTelemedicine Platform for HIPAA compliant video visits.
https://vsee.com/     Dr. Joiner of Wayne State describes it: “VSee is a version of videoconferencing (we use it w/ our online students when holding synchronous meetings). VSee is a great tool to continue the conversation and 2 engage beyond the traditional classroom .”

Restorative Justice http://restorativejustice.org/

German Prison System: CBS 60 Minutes April 3 2016
Privacy, weekend leave, keys…This is prison?
Script: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-germany-prisons-crime-and-punishment/

Mental Health Courts
Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ginger-lernerwren/the-top-five-lessons-from_b_8024440.html

 

 

Documentary Movie Night 3/31/16 – A New State of Mind: Ending the Stigma of Mental Illness

A new mind

 

For our March 2016 Documentary Movie Night, we will be watching A New State of Mind: Ending the Stigma of Mental Illness produced by the public television station KVIE-TV in California. Here is the description of the movie:

“A New State of Mind” is an hour long documentary that was produced in the state of California by the public television station KVIE-TV for a mental health awareness month in May 2013. Its aim is to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness and to encourage sufferers to seek help earlier rather than later in their illness. The film is freely available to watch online at Vimeo.com and the makers are keen for it to be viewed as widely as possible. Further information about California’s Mental Health Movement can be accessed at their website called Each Mind Matters, where there are also some other interesting videos available to watch.

“A New State of Mind” features some famous people from the political and sporting worlds as well as ordinary people who come from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. The film is filled with hope and a positive attitude and is narrated by the well-known actress Glenn Close, co-founder of the national anti-stigma campaign in America called Bring Change 2 Mind, which aims to remove misconceptions about mental illness through public education. Glenn Close has become a mental health advocate as a result of having her sister diagnosed with bipolar disorder and her nephew diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder.

Here is a link the movie (57 minutes): https://vimeo.com/67439197.  You can watch the movie for free.

This movie shows what it is like to live with mental illness in the US.  As you watch the movie, put on your #MacroSW hat and think about some of the policy, research and other macro-level issues that surround the individuals and families in this movie.

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the challenges for individuals suffering from mental health challenges and their families?
  2. What are some macro-level approaches to addressing these challenges?
  3. What do you think is the most important policy issue affecting individuals with mental health problems? Why?
  4. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about individuals with mental health problems?
  5. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  6. What’s next? How do we as social workers address the challenges experienced by individuals with mental health challenges?

Here is the transcript for this chat:  chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/documentary-movie-night-3-31-16-a-new-state-of-min#publicize 

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

 

 

#SWmonth and What We’ve Been Up To! #MacroSW chat 3/24/16 at 9pm EDT

logo for 2016 Social Work Month, with the hashtag #SWmonth and the phrase "March is Social Work Month"

Archive of this chat can be found here.

 

 

 

 

 

Join us as we ask, “What have you done for Social Work Month?” We want to hear all about the observances that you social workers made or have plans for during the last week of #SWmonth.

We’ll offer a few of our own activities to start out the chat – and we ask you to share those photos, articles or other resources that will provide inspiration for next year!

Host: Pat Shelly @UBSSW

 

  1. Why was March chosen for Social Work Month?
  2. What did you do for Social Work Month?
  3. Did your employer observe Social Work Month in any way, or your social work students?
  4. Can you share your best times / ideas / activities for Social Work Month?
  5. Have you received or given any signs of appreciation – verbal or otherwise – because it is prime time to #ThankASocialWorker?
  6. Any advice for a great 2017 SW Month?

Let’s Celebrate #SWMonth Heroes! #MacroSW 3/3 at 9pm EST

swmonthlogo2016
Image courtesy of Rhonda Ragsdale

Update: Chat archive now available!

In the 116th year of our profession, there are more than 600,000 social workers in the United States that likely passed through one of our 235 schools of social work. In fact, CSWE accredits close to 800 social work programs and many schools have both BSW and MSW accreditations. One of the reasons why social work has been called “the 21st century law degree” is because it embraces every possible super power. Need to navigate the patchwork quilt we call our health care system? Call a social worker. Need to pull together legislation to that protects the most vulnerable Americans? Call a social worker. Need to mend a broken relationship, heal wounds from childhood abuse and neglect, or overcome the fears standing in the way of becoming the best person you can be? Call a social worker. If social workers were to dress up like the superheroes they are and stand on the steps outside of ComiCon, they would probably look something like this:

9671555904_6489f940d1_z
Some rights reserved by PatLoika

For #SWMonth 2016, #MacroSW is partnering with some of the most important and influential social work organizations on social media. We are joining our wondertwin powers on Twitter to celebrate and promote social work. Our team of collaborating superheroes this month include:

AASWSW-DFrBF-4U.jpg-large NASW 2 Color (jpg, color).jpg

image001
NASW National Conference

Our chat questions are:

  1. Why is #SWMonth important?
  2. What do you wish more people appreciated about social workers?
  3. With which industries should social works develop more effective partnerships?
  4. Who is your social work hero?/ What social worker inspires you?
  5. What is your favorite social work superpower?
  6. This Social Work Month, about which of these are you most excited?


Creative Commons License
Our Favorite Macro Social Workers by Sunya Folayan and Karen Zgoda is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.