Media Night 12/22/16 – Human Investment in #MacroSW Practice

peopleClick here for the Storify transcript from the chat and click here is the Symplur transcript.

For our December Media Night, we will be talking about the video Human Investment which is an educational short video that explores through the use of compelling narrative about what drives dedicated social workers and other professionals to invest themselves in the humanity of care.  This video was created by Sherry Saturno, LCSW, DCSW, who received her MSW from Columbia University. She is a Westchester County District Leader (Tarrytown, NY-Democrat) who works in nursing home administration. She was awarded the NASW Social Worker of the Year for New York State (2012), as well as NASW Westchester County, NY Social Worker of the Year (2010).

typeFor this chat, we will discuss some of the topics raised in this video in the context of macro social work practice, especially how we can invest in ourselves as professionals to improve the lives of our clients and communities.

This video won a 2016 Media Award from National Association of Social Workers (NASW):  http://www.socialworkersspeak.org/hollywood-connection/and-the-2016-nasw-media-award-winners-are.html

Here is a link the video Human Investment which is 22 minutes long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRJs_Cly4Kkv.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. How do macro social workers best contribute to the care of clients – human investment?
  2. What issue from the video was most interesting to you and why?
  3. What are the most pressing issues for today’s macro social workers?
  4. What motivates you to be a social worker and/or practice #MacroSW?
  5. What was the best piece of advice that you learned from this video and why?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 10.27.16 – Inequality for All with Jimmy Young of California State University San Marcos

Here are the transcripts for tonight:

Storify Transcript: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-10-27-16-inequality-for-all-with-jimmy

Symplur Transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=10%2F27%2F2016&shour=17&smin=00&tdate=10%2F27%2F2016&thour=20&tmin=30

For our October Media Night, we will be talking about income inequality in a student-focused #MacroSW chat.  Social work students (and everyone else) from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused chat about income equality. 

Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professors Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) of California State University San Marcos (@csusmnews) will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, October 27th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

jimmyyoungOur host is Dr. Jimmy Young, an Assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at California State University San Marcos. He graduated with his PhD in social work from Virginia Commonwealth University and his MSW & MPA from Eastern Washington University. His main focus is around social work education and nonprofit organizations, and his research is centered on these two areas as they relate to the use of technology and specifically social media.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. See below for information on how to access the movie.
  2. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  3. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social work professor Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) and Laurel Hitchcock on the #MacroSW Official Twitter handle @OfficialMacroSW. Include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.
  4. Following the live chat, your instructor may also ask you to write a brief self-reflection essay about your experience of participating in this event.

The written parts of the assignment are optional and are not required to participate. However, we do encourage you to take some time to reflect upon what you learn from the film and the topics that are discussed in the chat. How might they inform your future social work practice?

To Access the Film: Click on the following link and use the password bernie2016:Inequalityforall

https://vimeo.com/141725998

Inequality for All runs 1 hour and 29 minutes, and is also available for streaming from iTunes and Amazon Prime. You can still request the DVD from Netflix. Alternatively, you can watch this interview between Bill Moyers and Robert Reich discussing the film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-rpkZe2OEo

About the Film: Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film that examines the widening income gap in the United States. Using the stories of real people and real lives, the narrative explores the effects this increasing gap has not only on the U.S. economy but also on democracy itself. Presented by American economist, author and professor Robert Reich, the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking.

Questions for the live chat:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How do we as social workers address inequality or move forward?

If you are an educator wanting to incorporate this chat as an assignment in your class, please click here for details.  We hope you can join us! Please contact Jimmy or Laurel if you plan to have your class or maybe student groups participate in the chat.  They will also welcome your questions.  

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Documentary Movie Night 5/26/16 – Between World: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence

Click here for transcript from this chat.

For our May 2016 Documentary Movie Night, we will be watching Between Worlds: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence produced by the Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law and winner of the Virtual Ovation Award at the Council on Social Work Education’s 2014 Virtual Film Festival.

Here is the description of the movie from the Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law’s website (@DocuLaw):Between Worlds

This video focuses on the unique challenges immigrant women face in navigating the road to independence that arise from language barriers, cultural differences, social isolation, and economic insecurity stemming from their inability to obtain legal employment. Five brave survivors of domestic violence describe the hurdles they faced in escaping abusive circumstances, accessing social and legal services, and attaining legal immigration status. Social workers, health care providers, law enforcement officers, and lawyers who wish to assist immigrant victims of domestic violence should find this video useful.

Here is a link the movie (19 minutes): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZUV2tsMEw8. You can watch the movie for free.

This movie tells the stories of five women who immigrated to the United States and then experienced domestic violence in a country where they did not speak the language and were without support of family.  As you watch the movie, put on your #MacroSW hat and think about some of the policy, research and other macro-level issues that surround the individuals and families in this movie.

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the challenges for immigrant women who were victims of domestic violence? What ab their children?
  2. What are some macro-level approaches to addressing the challenges faced by immigrant women who are also victims of domestic violence?
  3. What do you think is the most important policy issue affecting immigrant women who experience domestic violence? Why?
  4. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about immigrant women living in the US who are also victims of domestic violence?
  5. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  6. What’s next? How do we as social workers address the challenges experienced by immigrant women who experience domestic violence?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

 

Privilege, Difference, and Justice in the Context of Community Organizing and Activism: #MacroSW Chat April 9th 9:00pm EST

Update: Chat archive available!

Reposted from: #MacroSW Chat April 9th 9:00pm EST Norfolk State University and University of Oklahoma | srbrady78.

5697895_5c57981a6d
Some rights reserved by mindgutter

On April 9th from 9-10PM EST, social work students from Norfolk State University and the University of Oklahoma will be engaging in a Twitter dialogue about privilege, difference, and justice in the context of community organizing and activism. The Twitter chat will be facilitated by the Association for Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA) @acosaorg, along with guest facilitators, Dr. Shane Brady, MSW, PhD, long time community organizer and current professor of social work at the University of Oklahoma and Dr. Jason M. Sawyer, MSW, PhD, community organizer and professor at Norfolk State University School of Social Work.This Twitter dialogue welcomes the participation and contributions from social workers, students, academics, activists, and allies from around the world.

#MacroSW Shout Outs

#MacroSW chats takes place on Twitter on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. The chat is a collaboration between the Association for Community Organization and Social Administration (ACOSA) @acosaorg, The Network for Social Work Management (NSWM) @TheNSWM, USC School of Social Work @MSWatUSC, the University at Buffalo School of Social Work @UBSSW, Karen Zgoda @karenzgoda, and Sunya Folayan @SunyaFolayan.Background The frame for this discussion will be set through the watching of two best practice case studies in community organizing; Holding Ground and Gaining Ground, the story of the Dudley Street Initiative. While these films will provide some context for how grass roots community organizing and activism can lead to social change, dialogue in this chat will focus on recent events from Ferguson to #SAEHatesMe to anti LGBTQ bills, all of which have led to local and student led activism and community organizing.

How to Participate

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate: Watch the documentaries Holding Ground and Gaining Ground: The Story of the Dudley Street Initiative, if possible. Many university libraries have these films available or trailers can be found for them on YouTube and other related sites. As you watch the film, take a few moments to consider current issues impacting your community and communities around the U.S. and world. Think about how difference between groups of people leads to and/or perpetuates injustice as well as slows community organizing and social change. Also think about the lessons learned from Dudley Street or from other successful grass roots organizing and activist efforts that you may be familiar with. What made them so successful? How did they address difference? and What lessons learned can we take away from these efforts? Finally, what is the role of social work in grassroots organizing and social action? Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderator @Dr_Pracademic and/or @Dr_PraxisAlly and include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.

Values and Principles for Anti-Oppressive Dialogue Adapted from Fithian

The purpose of this Twitter chat is to challenge our own thinking and to learn from one another within the context of a virtual space. In order to promote safety, respect, and mutual learning in this space, we ask that participants read over these suggested values and principles for Anti-Oppressive Intergroup Dialogue, which are grounded in the literature of positive peace, anti-oppressive community organizing, and intergroup dialogue.

1. Power and privilege can be destructive to group processes. Privilege, like power can be used for positive purposes but should be used with awareness and care.

2. Approach dialogues with cultural humility, since none of us can truly be experts about the experiences of another race, gender, religion, culture, social class, sexual orientation, or other positionally nor do we understand their experiences.

3. We can only identify how power and privilege play out when we are conscious and committed to understanding how racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism, classism, ableism, adultism, and other forms of oppression are perpetuated by both people and systems, beginning with ourselves.

4. Dialogue and discussion are necessary and we need to learn how to listen non-defensively and communicate respectfully if we are going to have effective anti-oppression practice.
5. Given that some dialogues may take place in virtual spaces, be extra mindful and considerate of how your responses and statements may be received by others who have never met you, cannot see your body language, and cannot hear your tone.
6. Dialogue is preferred over debate in the context of intergroup learning. The goal of a debate is often to one up someone, which can harm relationships and divide groups. On the contrary, the goal of a dialogue is to gain understanding about alternative perspectives and ideas.
7. Conflict is often unavoidable and on its own is not unhealthy, it’s how you facilitate and handle conflict that will determine if it is beneficial or detrimental to the dialogue.
8. Being called out can often be a gift to be embraced, be open to it; however, before calling people in can also be an effective strategy for identifying a challenging behavior or idea shared by another person in a group setting, and addressing it in a less threatening way for the purpose of helping the individual learn, and also acknowledging that ALL OF US make mistakes from time to time.
9. Keep an open mind. While it may seem simple, if you are unwilling to challenge your own thinking, beliefs, views, and values, I am not certain that a dialogue will benefit you much.
10. Hate Speech of any kind has no place in a dialogue space.
The following questions will be used to facilitate this dialogue:
  1. What are the most pressing issues impacting your community (Similar or Different from the issues impacting Dudley Street)?
  2. How do you see and/or experience difference in your community?
  3. Given recent events in Ferguson, NYC, Berkley, Oklahoma, and around the country, how do we effectively address difference in communities and in practice?
  4. What lessons, if any, do you take away from successful social action, practice, organizing efforts such as Dudley Street, #BlackLivesMatter, #OU_Unheard, Arab Spring, and others?
  5. Given the close knit ties of social work to federal, state, and local government agencies and funding streams, can we as a profession effectively and adequately promote grassroots organizing, social work practice across difference, and activism for social change, why or why not?
  6. Does social media and technology help or hinder dialogue and addressing difference in community organizing?

Additional Resources Dudley Street Initiative Website: http://www.dsni.orgUniversity of Michigan Program on Intergroup Relations: http://igr.umich.eduTeaching Tolerance website run by Southern Poverty Law Center:http://www.tolerance.org Community Toolbox by University of Kansas, resources on holding dialogues in communities: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/search/node/dialogue Anti-Oppressive community organizing resources by Lisa Fithian: http://organizingforpower.org/anti-oppression-

Many Thanks Everyone – shane and Jason

resources-exercises/ We look forward to hearing your voice and insights on April 9th!! – shane and Jason

via Privilege, Difference, and Justice in the Context of Community Organizing and Activism: #MacroSW Chat April 9th 9:00pm EST.

Special #MacroSW Chat October 28th at 8pm CST

JimmySW

UPDATE: This Chat was truly amazing. We hope to do this again as we have had spectacular feedback. If you are interested, you can check out this link to see the Chat archive.

The Live Chat questions will include:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How…

View original post 1,510 more words

Chat Recap: System Failure: How We Are Failing LGBT Youth

By Rachel L. West
Advocacy Consultant

System Failure: How We Are Failing LGBT Youth

The June 26th #MacroSW chat, System Failure: How We Are Failing LGBT Youth, was a great success. The chat covered the unmet needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth in the social welfare system. You can read the transcript here.

These are the resources I used to put the chat together. They are included in the transcript but I wanted to make it easier for people to access.

Books

Affirmative Practice: Understanding and Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender persons Ski Hunter and Jane C. Hickerson

Reports & Stats

News Articles
Organizations
National Anti-Violence Project:
Twitter handle @antiviolence
GLSEN – Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network:
Twitter handle @GLSEN
The Trevor Project:
Twitter handle @Trevor Project
The next chat will be on July 10th at 9:00 PM (eastern).