#MacroSW Chat 6/15/17: Aging in the 21st Century with Dr. Nathalie P. Jones

Update: the archive for this chat can be found here

For our Thursday chat on June 15th, #MacroSW chat will cover Aging in the 21s Century.

digital life

When thinking about aging in the 21st Century, consider that individuals are: living longer, making more healthy life choices, using technology to stimulate their minds, and becoming more physically active.

The current condition of the aging population is a focus of heightened discussion within the social work profession (one example of this focus is the upcoming virtual NASW conference, Aging Through the Social Work Lens). According to the National Institute on Aging, in 2010 there were 524 million people aged 65 years and older, representing eight percent of the global population. Moreover, older adults are increasing participation in physical activities, and have demonstrated increased technology use, which increases cognitive stimulation. This suggests possible explanations for increased life expectancy. As a result, academic and practical social workers are seeking deeper insights for this life expectancy, and overall quality of life.  Research emphasizes the life choices that the older adults are making as it relates to health, physical activity and brain activity through technology use. When older adults become more active, their heart rate increases and their confidence is heightened by their independence (Berlin, Kruger and Klenosky, 2017).

According to Pew Research Center, 79% of people in the United States use technology on a regular basis. Of this percentage, adults aged 65 to 69 are known to spend large amounts of time online. Technology use has become popular across the board with populations ranging from infancy to older adults. In particular, it has impacted the older population by increasing their cognitive activity; provided support for safety precautions (security cameras); and has allowed for overall heightened independence (Rogers, Stronge and Fisk, 2005). While the aging population has more choices to prolong life, it seems that they are in need of more social workers to support and advocate on their behalf. While discussing and exploring aging in the 21st Century, the limitations include current literature in practice and social work education on aging in the 21st century. The strengths include the ability to explore and to add to this body of literature as well as to increase the emphasis on social work with aging populations within social work education.ProfNJones

Our guest host will be Nathalie P. Jones, PhD, MSW (@DrNJonesTSU), Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Work at Tarleton State University.

Nathalie enjoys working with the aging population and has a research interest that includes Healthy Aging. As a Masters level student Nathalie completed her internship serving the older population. Also, while in practice Nathalie was a gerontology social worker for the West Palm Beach Housing Authority. Currently, she is a Faculty Fellow and is proud to have the opportunity to discuss Aging in the 21st Century during the #MacroSW chat.

Possible discussion questions for the #MacroSW chat:

  • When you were younger how did “aging” look to you?
  • As you got older, how did your impression of aging change?
  • What age is considered the late adulthood phase?
  • What does aging look like to you in the 21st Century?
  • What impact does the younger generation have on the aging population?
  • How has technology impacted the aging population currently, like social media?
  • How can social workers support the aging population in the 21st century?

Additional Questions:

  • In what ways have you seen technology among members of the aging population?
  • What barriers to physical activity have you seen older adults struggle with?
  • How should social workers become more visible/interactive with and to the aging population?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

References:

Anderson, M. & Perrin, A. (2017), Tech Adoption Climbs Among Older Adults. Pew Research Center Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/2017/05/17/tech-adoption-climbs-among-older-adults/

Berlin, K., Kruger, T., & Klenosky, D. B. (2016). A mixed-methods investigation of successful aging among older women engaged in sports-based versus exercise-based leisure time physical activities. Journal of Women & Aging, 1-11.

National Institute on Aging Retrieved from https://www.nia.nih.gov/research/publication/global-health-and-aging/living-longer

Rogers, W. A., Stronge, A. J., & Fisk, A. D. (2005). Technology and aging. Reviews of human factors and ergonomics, 1(1), 130-171.

Media Night – Bullied: The Jamie Nabozny Story #MacroSW Chat 4/20 at 9pm EST

This chat is archived here

Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 10.52.22 AM.pngFor our April 20th Media Night Chat, we will discuss the short documentary film Bullied: A Student, A School and a Case That Made History. The documentary features the story of Jamie Nabozny. While attending high school in Wisconsin, Nabozny suffered persistent, unchecked anti-gay attacks and harassment by classmates. For Nabozny, this abuse was understandably highly traumatic; however, as shown in the documentary, Nabozny was able to hold the school accountable for failing to acknowledge the true nature of the abuse. As the Southern Poverty Law Center states in its materials for this film, “anti-gay bullying is wrong – morally and legally.”

Bullied was produced by the Southern Policy Law Center, as part of their Teaching Tolerance program.

To prepare for this chat, please view short documentary, “Bullied: The Jamie Nabozny Story” at this link: https://youtu.be/FZZTjm1GoKs
Here are some questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. What issue from the video was most interesting to you and why?
  2. In what ways did Jamie’s system fail him?
  3. What are common misconceptions about bullying?
  4. For macro social workers, what are the key areas we need to address when we encounter bullying?
  5. What ethical duties do we have as social workers when we encounter bullying in our work environment (example: addressing the bystander effect?)
  6. What steps can we as social workers take to eliminate bullying from our schools?
  7. What other impressions of the film do you have?

 

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

References:

Jamie Nabozny’s Official Homepage: http://www.jamienabozny.com/

The Southern Policy Law Center, (2010, September 23),  “‘Bullied’ Offers Lessons for Students, Educators.”https://www.splcenter.org/news/2010/09/23/%E2%80%98bullied%E2%80%99-offers-lessons-students-educators

Teaching Tolerance: A Project of the Southern Policy Law Center. http://www.tolerance.org/

What’s Next after the Affordable Care Act? 2-16-2017 #MacroSW chat

Hospital lobby escalatorOne of the signature pieces of legislation during the Obama administration was passage of the Affordable Care Act. The ACA weathered many attempts to be derailed throughout the remainder of President Obama’s term, with dozens of votes to repeal the act held in the House. In 2010, after the Supreme Court upheld the law, it seemed Obamacare was positioned to remain in place.

While the ACA has been considered flawed, even by its strongest proponents, the law enacted a series of changes to health care access. These changes expanded health care to millions of people. These changes included:

Removing provisions allowing health care insurers to deny coverage based on pre-existing conditions;
Creating health care insurance marketplaces that allowed people without employer’s insurance to purchase health insurance coverage;
Providing subsidies to assist people in need in paying for health care insurance;
Allowing young adults to remain on their parents’ insurance until age 26

Now, with a new administration, the ACA is facing a critical crossroads. While President Trump campaigned on a platform to repeal the act and replacing it, it remains unclear what these changes will look like, and when these changes may occur. While some proposals have been offered, the law in its current form remains in place. Meanwhile, as the current congress deliberates on what changes should occur, public opinion on the ACA law has reached a new high in popularity.

Social workers in clinical, inpatient care, and policy settings have had an emerging leadership role with the ACA. Now, our profession looks to ensure that gains made for individuals and their families are not lost and promoting ways to improve access to healthcare in the United States.

Here are some questions we will discuss this week:

How has the ACA changed health care access for you, your clients or communities?
What do you think will happen if the ACA is repealed?
What do you think could be done to improve the ACA?
What do you think is the most common misunderstanding about the ACA? Why?
How should social workers respond to the possible repeal of the ACA?

Resources:

As GOP pushes repeal, Obamacare has never been more popular: NBC News/WSJ Poll (NBC News): http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/first-read/brink-repeal-obamacare-has-never-been-more-popular-n707806

How repealing portions of the Affordable Care Act would affect health insurance coverage and premiums (Congressional Budget Office Report): https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/reports/52371-coverageandpremiums.pdf

Issue: Ensure that social workers are frontline health providers to effect Affordable Care Act integration (NASW): https://www.socialworkers.org/advocacy/documents/PP-FL-19716.IssueBrief-ACA-NC.pdf