Media Night 01/26/2017 – Status of Child Welfare Workforce in US

Here is the transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=01%2F26%2F2017&shour=17&smin=30&tdate=01%2F26%2F2017&thour=19&tmin=30

For our January Media Night, we will be talking about the current status of child welfare workforce in the US. This #MacroSW chat will focus on how those who practice macro social work can empower and impact change to address many of the long standing issues related to our country’s child welfare system and workforce.

imagesPlease read the following statement from the National Association of Social Workers about how to strengthen delivery of services to children and families in the US: NASW’s Advocacy Issues Statement on Child Welfare

This infographic from the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute also provides some back ground information: Why the Workforce Matters

toodsageOur host will be Todd Sage (@socialworksage) who is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of North Dakota. Todd has 10 years of child welfare work experience in three states and is currently the grant coordinator for UND’s National Child Welfare Workforce Initiative (NCWWI) grant. The grants focus is to address training, recruitment and retention of front line child welfare workers.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. In 2014, @NASW reported over 147K children received Foster Care services. What role does #MacroSW play in ensuring appropriate services?
  2.  How can the Macro SW community address large CPS caseloads, employee turnover & caseworkers needing more training to improve outcomes?
  3. Programs are at risk with the appt. of Tom Price as Sec of HHS. @NASW has opposed his appointment. How will you work to protect services?
  4. How would you design a national recruitment campaign to encourage SWKers to go into CW practice?
  5. The Social Work Reinvestment Act has proposed funding and support for SW and CW. How can we get this act passed?
  6. How can #MacroSW address the disproportionality of persons of color in CW?

About #MacroSW Media Nights: Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

About #MacroSW: #MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

Media Night 12/22/16 – Human Investment in #MacroSW Practice

peopleClick here for the Storify transcript from the chat and click here is the Symplur transcript.

For our December Media Night, we will be talking about the video Human Investment which is an educational short video that explores through the use of compelling narrative about what drives dedicated social workers and other professionals to invest themselves in the humanity of care.  This video was created by Sherry Saturno, LCSW, DCSW, who received her MSW from Columbia University. She is a Westchester County District Leader (Tarrytown, NY-Democrat) who works in nursing home administration. She was awarded the NASW Social Worker of the Year for New York State (2012), as well as NASW Westchester County, NY Social Worker of the Year (2010).

typeFor this chat, we will discuss some of the topics raised in this video in the context of macro social work practice, especially how we can invest in ourselves as professionals to improve the lives of our clients and communities.

This video won a 2016 Media Award from National Association of Social Workers (NASW):  http://www.socialworkersspeak.org/hollywood-connection/and-the-2016-nasw-media-award-winners-are.html

Here is a link the video Human Investment which is 22 minutes long: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRJs_Cly4Kkv.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. How do macro social workers best contribute to the care of clients – human investment?
  2. What issue from the video was most interesting to you and why?
  3. What are the most pressing issues for today’s macro social workers?
  4. What motivates you to be a social worker and/or practice #MacroSW?
  5. What was the best piece of advice that you learned from this video and why?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 11.17.16 – Language Matters in #MacroSW w/ @socworkpodcast & @StuckonSW

Here is the transcript for the chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-11-17-16-language-matters-in-macrosw-w#publicize

For our November Media Night, we will be talking about how language matters in macro social work practice, specifically when talking about suicide.

Here is a link the article for our Media Night, Let’s Talk about Suicide: #LanguageMatters:

http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/practice/lets-talk-about-suicide-languagematters/.  Please read this article in preparation for Thursday’s chat.

languagemattersgreenExcerpt from the article:

Researchers have shown that even subtle changes in language can change reality (Borowditsky, 2011). Every social work student has heard the phrase “person-first” language. Instead of saying, “He is schizophrenic,” we say, “He (the person) has a diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Why? Person-first language honors the dignity and worth of the person. And although some people confuse social workers’ use of language as being “politically correct,” we know the words we use to communicate to our clients and others have power. Words can construct a reality of hope and acceptance, or despair and rejection. And when we’re talking about suicide, those words can be a matter of life or death.

#LanguageMatters are two articles featured in the New Social Worker Magazine. These covered some issues in clinical social work on the topics of Suicide and Borderline Personality Disorder. #MacroSW wanted to explore how language affects Macro practice issues.

Our hosts will be:

sj
J. Singer

Jonathan Singer, PhD, LCSW (@socworkpodcast)  is an associate professor at Loyola University in Chicago and creator of The Social Work Podcast.

 

 

se
S. Erreger

Sean Erreger, LCSW (@StuckOnSW) is a Mental Health care manager and a social work adjunct instructor. In addition to his active voice on Twitter, he runs the blog Stuck on Social Work.

 

 

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Why are we talking about #LanguageMatter? Isn’t that obvious?
  2. What are preferred and problematic terms when talking about #suicide?
  3. What can organizations do to address suicide risk?
  4. What are some examples you have seen how language has affected your social work practice?
  5. What is our responsibility as social workers to point out prejudicial / discriminatory language?
  6. Can slight changes in language help change how macro social work practice is delivered?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 10.27.16 – Inequality for All with Jimmy Young of California State University San Marcos

Here are the transcripts for tonight:

Storify Transcript: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-10-27-16-inequality-for-all-with-jimmy

Symplur Transcript: http://embed.symplur.com/twitter/transcript?hashtag=MacroSW&fdate=10%2F27%2F2016&shour=17&smin=00&tdate=10%2F27%2F2016&thour=20&tmin=30

For our October Media Night, we will be talking about income inequality in a student-focused #MacroSW chat.  Social work students (and everyone else) from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused chat about income equality. 

Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professors Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) of California State University San Marcos (@csusmnews) will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, October 27th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

jimmyyoungOur host is Dr. Jimmy Young, an Assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at California State University San Marcos. He graduated with his PhD in social work from Virginia Commonwealth University and his MSW & MPA from Eastern Washington University. His main focus is around social work education and nonprofit organizations, and his research is centered on these two areas as they relate to the use of technology and specifically social media.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. See below for information on how to access the movie.
  2. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  3. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social work professor Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) and Laurel Hitchcock on the #MacroSW Official Twitter handle @OfficialMacroSW. Include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.
  4. Following the live chat, your instructor may also ask you to write a brief self-reflection essay about your experience of participating in this event.

The written parts of the assignment are optional and are not required to participate. However, we do encourage you to take some time to reflect upon what you learn from the film and the topics that are discussed in the chat. How might they inform your future social work practice?

To Access the Film: Click on the following link and use the password bernie2016:Inequalityforall

https://vimeo.com/141725998

Inequality for All runs 1 hour and 29 minutes, and is also available for streaming from iTunes and Amazon Prime. You can still request the DVD from Netflix. Alternatively, you can watch this interview between Bill Moyers and Robert Reich discussing the film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-rpkZe2OEo

About the Film: Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film that examines the widening income gap in the United States. Using the stories of real people and real lives, the narrative explores the effects this increasing gap has not only on the U.S. economy but also on democracy itself. Presented by American economist, author and professor Robert Reich, the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking.

Questions for the live chat:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How do we as social workers address inequality or move forward?

If you are an educator wanting to incorporate this chat as an assignment in your class, please click here for details.  We hope you can join us! Please contact Jimmy or Laurel if you plan to have your class or maybe student groups participate in the chat.  They will also welcome your questions.  

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

Media Night 9.29.16 – Environmental Justice

Here is the transcript for this chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-9-29-16-environmental-justice 

For our September Media Night, we will be talking about environmental justice as an important area of macro social work practice.

environmentaljustice_imageEnvironmental justice gets at the notion that all people have a right to a clean, safe, environment regardless of their race, ethnicity, SES, gender, and no matter where they live. In this chat, we’ll be discussing lead exposure as an environmental justice issue of particular importance to social workers.

Here is a link the article, Freddie Gray’s life a study on the effects of lead paint on poor blacks by Terrence McCoy of the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/freddie-grays-life-a-study-in-the-sad-effects-of-lead-paint-on-poor-blacks/2015/04/29/0be898e6-eea8-11e4-8abc-d6aa3bad79dd_story.html.

samantha-teixeira-513x336Our host will is Dr. Samantha Teixeira from the School of Social Work at Boston College. Samantha Teixeira, PhD, joined the faculty at the School of Social Work in 2015. Her research focuses on how neighborhood environmental conditions affect youth and how youth can be engaged in creating solutions to environmental problems in their communities. In order to better address neighborhood environmental disparities, Dr. Teixeira utilizes a community based participatory research approach to identify community environmental issues and learn how they shape life in disadvantaged neighborhoods, particularly among youth. In her work, she uses innovative, mixed methods approaches including photography, community mapping, in-depth interviews, and spatial analysis to uncover the perspectives of neighborhood residents and intervene in community problems.

She has published on the topics of place-based, comprehensive community interventions that address neighborhood environmental disparities, youth-led participatory research, and environmental justice interventions and education. Samantha’s diverse practice experience includes work in child protective services, community organizing and development, and local government initiatives.

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Would you consider lead exposure to be an environmental justice (EJ) issue? Why?
  2. Why is lead exposure an important environmental/contextual consideration when considering the life and death of Freddie Gray?
  3. EJ issues have been called a form of “slow violence” that causes injury more slowly than typical acts of violence. How does slow violence relate to Gray’s Baltimore community?
  4. In the graphic “Baltimore neighborhoods with elevated lead levels” click to see maps illustrating lead levels, vacant property, & child poverty. What do you see here?
  5. This article illustrates many interconnections between micro and macro social work issues. Identify issues at different systems levels and how they interconnect.
  6. The article alludes to the connection between lead exposure and violence. How do you think these issues relate?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

 

#MacroSW Media Night 6/30/16 – Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA

Click here for a copy of the chat transcript.

downloadFor our June Media Night, we will be watching Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA produced by Frontline.  Here is the description of the movie:

In Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA, FRONTLINE goes inside the politics of America’s gun debate. Veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk investigates the NRA, its political evolution and influence, and how it has consistently succeeded in defeating new gun control legislation.

Here is a link the movie (54 minutes): http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/gunned-down/.  You can watch the movie for free.  

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the special interests influencing the gun debate in America? #MacroSW
  2. How are current gun policies affecting your community? And the individuals & families who live in your community? #MacroSW
  3. How can we start talking about gun policies in America in more inclusive way; with less divisiveness? #MacroSW
  4. How do our professional ethics guide social workers in responding to the gun debate? #MacroSW
  5. What lessons about lobbying have you learned that can be applied to #MacroSW?
  6. What single word best describes how the film made you feel? #MacroSW
  7. What’s next? How do we as social workers promote practical solutions to the gun debates in America? #MacroSW

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Documentary Movie Night 5/26/16 – Between World: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence

Click here for transcript from this chat.

For our May 2016 Documentary Movie Night, we will be watching Between Worlds: Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence produced by the Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law and winner of the Virtual Ovation Award at the Council on Social Work Education’s 2014 Virtual Film Festival.

Here is the description of the movie from the Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law’s website (@DocuLaw):Between Worlds

This video focuses on the unique challenges immigrant women face in navigating the road to independence that arise from language barriers, cultural differences, social isolation, and economic insecurity stemming from their inability to obtain legal employment. Five brave survivors of domestic violence describe the hurdles they faced in escaping abusive circumstances, accessing social and legal services, and attaining legal immigration status. Social workers, health care providers, law enforcement officers, and lawyers who wish to assist immigrant victims of domestic violence should find this video useful.

Here is a link the movie (19 minutes): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZUV2tsMEw8. You can watch the movie for free.

This movie tells the stories of five women who immigrated to the United States and then experienced domestic violence in a country where they did not speak the language and were without support of family.  As you watch the movie, put on your #MacroSW hat and think about some of the policy, research and other macro-level issues that surround the individuals and families in this movie.

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the challenges for immigrant women who were victims of domestic violence? What ab their children?
  2. What are some macro-level approaches to addressing the challenges faced by immigrant women who are also victims of domestic violence?
  3. What do you think is the most important policy issue affecting immigrant women who experience domestic violence? Why?
  4. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about immigrant women living in the US who are also victims of domestic violence?
  5. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  6. What’s next? How do we as social workers address the challenges experienced by immigrant women who experience domestic violence?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

 

Grand Challenges #MacroSW Chat – Social Isolation on 5/12/16

GC_SocialIsolation_Page_01Click here to read the chat transcript.

Join the next in a series of #MacroSW Chats about the Grand Challenges from the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare.  Our chat on Thursday, May 12 at 9:00 PM EST will be co-hosted by  the AASWSW (@AASWSWorg) and Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock), focusing on social isolation.

Social isolation is correlated with an array of negative health outcomes. It can happen at any age but is more common among older adults. Social isolation is a silent killer—as dangerous to health as smoking. According to a 2013 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study, social isolation was associated with a more than 25 percent likelihood of premature death.

Eradicating social isolation represents one of the 12 Grand Challenges for Social Work (GCSW) announced by the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare earlier this year.

Our May 12th Twitter chat will discuss questions related to this critical issue such as:

  1. What are the health and other effects of social isolation?
  2. What are the most important risk factors for social isolation?
  3. What are innovative strategies for reducing social isolation and increasing social engagement?
  4. What is the role of social work in reducing social isolation?

Further reading on Social Isolation

Learn More about the Grand Challenges for Social Work

You can read more about the Grand Challenges and join the initiative at: http://aaswsw.org/grand-challenges-initiative/.

You can also read the blog posts from previous GSCW-themed Twitter chats on:

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Documentary Movie Night 4/28/16 – Wilhemina’s War

wilhemina-s-war-385391-posterHere is link to the chat transcript.

For our April 2016 Documentary Movie Night, we will be watching Wilhemina’s War about the impact of HIV/AIDS in the rural South among women of color.

Here is the description of the movie from the PBS website:

In much of America, progress in HIV/AIDS treatment and improvement in education may suggest the worst is behind us, but every year 50,000 Americans are still diagnosed with the virus that causes AIDS. Astonishingly, nearly half of them live in the South, where the AIDS epidemic has taken root in rural communities, and is one of the leading causes of death among African Americans.

Wilhemina’s War is the story of Wilhemina Dixon, an uneducated daughter of sharecroppers who becomes a force in her family’s fight for survival from HIV and AIDS. Shot over the course of five years, the film bears witness to the resilience and determination of the human spirit in the face of tremendous adversity.  Wilhemina, or “Mina,” as everyone calls her, knows little about public policy, but a great deal about caring for the sick. Five of her family members are living with HIV, and she is the caregiver for her daughter, Toni, a drug addict, and her teenage granddaughter, Dayshal, born with HIV and now the victim of online bullying.

Here is a link the movie (55 minutes):
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/videos/wilheminas-war-full-film/.  You can watch the movie for free.

This movie shows what it is like to be a woman of color living with AIDs/HIV in the rural South in the US.  As you watch the movie, put on your #MacroSW hat and think about some of the policy, research and other macro-level issues that surround the individuals and families in this movie.

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the challenges for individuals and their families in the rural South who are suffering from AIDS/HIV?
  2. What are some macro-level approaches to addressing these challenges?
  3. What do you think is the most important policy issue affecting individuals with AIDS/HIV? Why?
  4. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about individuals living with AIDS/HIV, especially in the rural South?
  5. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  6. What’s next? How do we as social workers address the challenges experienced by individuals with living with AIDS/HIV?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Documentary Movie Night 3/31/16 – A New State of Mind: Ending the Stigma of Mental Illness

A new mind

 

For our March 2016 Documentary Movie Night, we will be watching A New State of Mind: Ending the Stigma of Mental Illness produced by the public television station KVIE-TV in California. Here is the description of the movie:

“A New State of Mind” is an hour long documentary that was produced in the state of California by the public television station KVIE-TV for a mental health awareness month in May 2013. Its aim is to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness and to encourage sufferers to seek help earlier rather than later in their illness. The film is freely available to watch online at Vimeo.com and the makers are keen for it to be viewed as widely as possible. Further information about California’s Mental Health Movement can be accessed at their website called Each Mind Matters, where there are also some other interesting videos available to watch.

“A New State of Mind” features some famous people from the political and sporting worlds as well as ordinary people who come from a variety of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. The film is filled with hope and a positive attitude and is narrated by the well-known actress Glenn Close, co-founder of the national anti-stigma campaign in America called Bring Change 2 Mind, which aims to remove misconceptions about mental illness through public education. Glenn Close has become a mental health advocate as a result of having her sister diagnosed with bipolar disorder and her nephew diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder.

Here is a link the movie (57 minutes): https://vimeo.com/67439197.  You can watch the movie for free.

This movie shows what it is like to live with mental illness in the US.  As you watch the movie, put on your #MacroSW hat and think about some of the policy, research and other macro-level issues that surround the individuals and families in this movie.

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the challenges for individuals suffering from mental health challenges and their families?
  2. What are some macro-level approaches to addressing these challenges?
  3. What do you think is the most important policy issue affecting individuals with mental health problems? Why?
  4. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about individuals with mental health problems?
  5. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  6. What’s next? How do we as social workers address the challenges experienced by individuals with mental health challenges?

Here is the transcript for this chat:  chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/documentary-movie-night-3-31-16-a-new-state-of-min#publicize 

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com