A True History of Social Workers Online: #MacroSW 12/1 at 9 pm EST

Chat archive available here!

historyofsw
Screenshot of timeline by Susan Mankita and Linda Grobman from http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/technology-articles/true-history-of-social-workers-online/

Guest Experts

lindagrobman
Linda Grobman, MSW, ACSW, LSW

Linda Grobman, MSW, ACSW, LSW, is the publisher, editor, and founder of the award-winning The New Social Worker magazine (www.socialworker.com). Linda has had an interest in connecting with social workers online since the late 1980s, and has published a technology column in The New Social Worker since its beginning in 1994.  She also co-authored The Social Worker’s Internet Handbook with Gary Grant in 1998. Linda was 2014 Social Worker of the Year for PA NASW and was named NASW Social Work Pioneer this year for “…supporting early-career social workers through her innovative publishing endeavors, and embracing technology for social workers—and in the intersection of the two.”

susanmankita
Susan Mankita, MSW, LCSW

Susan Mankita, MSW, LCSW has been educating social workers about technology since 1995. She founded the AOL Social Work Forum, one of the earliest and the longest running online communities for social workers. She connected thousands of social workers there, and later, through SocialWorkChat.org. These long running online communities for social workers, enabled easy access to support, mentoring and training FOR colleagues BY colleagues, long before the existence of Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter. She provided the earliest training about the Internet to NASW’s National Board of Directors, and The Association of Social Work Boards before many of them had access to email.  Currently, Susan owns a professional development company for social workers and provides licensure preparation focused on struggling re-takers.  She teaches social work practice courses at FIU. She was the 2013 Social Worker of the Year for both the Miami-Dade Unit and Florida Chapter of NASW.

In April 2016, Susan Mankita and Linda Grobman presented at the 2016 Social Work Distance Education conference on the topic, “A True History of Social Workers Online.”

They presented a timeline, which represents major events and memories in the development of social workers’ use of the Internet beginning in the 1980s. Through this timeline and presentation at the Social Work Distance Education conference in April 2016, in Indianapolis, IN, and now through this Twitter chat, Susan and Linda seek to preserve the rich history of social workers’ use of the Internet, dispel the myth that social workers have not been and are not online, and emphasize the value of the relationships formed through online networking by social workers with social workers.

Please join us for this discussion with two early adopters of online networking for social workers.

Here are questions we will discuss:

  1. So now you’ve heard our early experiences. Fill in some gaps. What’s your earliest experience with social work or social workers online?
  2. Building community and insuring social presence. Here’s how we did it. How has it changed?
  3. You are our legacy. What do you hope your legacy will be? What will social workers be doing online 15-20 years from now?

Seriously Old but Appropriately Selected References:

  • Bellamy, D. (1987). Innovative applications of computer technology in social work. Paper presented at the Conference of the Canadian Association of Schools of Social Work, Learned Societies Meeting, Hamilton, Ontario, June 7.
  • Cnaan, R.A. (1989).  Introduction: Social work practice and information technology – an unestablished link. Computers in Human Services, 5(1/2), 1-15.
  • Colon Y. (1996). Chatter(er)ing through the fingertips: Doing group therapy online. Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory (9), 205-215.
  • Giffords, E. (1998).  Social Work on the Internet:  An Introduction.  Social Work, 43(2), 243 – 251.
  • Grant G.B. & Grobman, L.M. (1998).  The social worker’s internet handbook.  Harrisburg, PA:  White Hat Communications.
  • Marson, S. M. (1998).  Major uses of the internet for social workers: A brief report for new users. Arete, 22(2), 21-28. Retrieved from http://www.marson-and-associates.com/resume/RMajor.pdf
  • Marson, S. M. (2003). A Selective History of Internet Technology and Social Work,” that was published in Computers in Human Services, 14:2, 35 — 49.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J407v14n02_03
  • National Association of Social Workers & Association of Social Work Boards (2005).  Standards for technology and social work practice. Available at http://www.socialworkers.org/practice/standards/NASWTechnologyStandards.pdf
  • Smith, M. (2009). What my LED ball reveals about the future of technology and social work: a farewell aloha. Retrieved from http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/technology-articles/What_My_LED_Ball_Reveals_About_the_Future_of_Technology_and_Social_Work%3A_A_Farewell_Aloha/
  • Vernon, R. and Lynch, D. (2000)  Social work and the web.   Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks-Cole.
  • Vest, G., Pruett, K. & Holmgren, B. (n.d). Social advocacy, brokering and networking with pc’s. Retrieved from http://www.socialworksearch.com/research/researchgv.shtml

Media Night 11.17.16 – Language Matters in #MacroSW w/ @socworkpodcast & @StuckonSW

Here is the transcript for the chat: https://storify.com/OfficialMacroSW/media-night-11-17-16-language-matters-in-macrosw-w#publicize

For our November Media Night, we will be talking about how language matters in macro social work practice, specifically when talking about suicide.

Here is a link the article for our Media Night, Let’s Talk about Suicide: #LanguageMatters:

http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/practice/lets-talk-about-suicide-languagematters/.  Please read this article in preparation for Thursday’s chat.

languagemattersgreenExcerpt from the article:

Researchers have shown that even subtle changes in language can change reality (Borowditsky, 2011). Every social work student has heard the phrase “person-first” language. Instead of saying, “He is schizophrenic,” we say, “He (the person) has a diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Why? Person-first language honors the dignity and worth of the person. And although some people confuse social workers’ use of language as being “politically correct,” we know the words we use to communicate to our clients and others have power. Words can construct a reality of hope and acceptance, or despair and rejection. And when we’re talking about suicide, those words can be a matter of life or death.

#LanguageMatters are two articles featured in the New Social Worker Magazine. These covered some issues in clinical social work on the topics of Suicide and Borderline Personality Disorder. #MacroSW wanted to explore how language affects Macro practice issues.

Our hosts will be:

sj
J. Singer

Jonathan Singer, PhD, LCSW (@socworkpodcast)  is an associate professor at Loyola University in Chicago and creator of The Social Work Podcast.

 

 

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S. Erreger

Sean Erreger, LCSW (@StuckOnSW) is a Mental Health care manager and a social work adjunct instructor. In addition to his active voice on Twitter, he runs the blog Stuck on Social Work.

 

 

Our #MacroSW Partner facilitating the chat is Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock).

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. Why are we talking about #LanguageMatter? Isn’t that obvious?
  2. What are preferred and problematic terms when talking about #suicide?
  3. What can organizations do to address suicide risk?
  4. What are some examples you have seen how language has affected your social work practice?
  5. What is our responsibility as social workers to point out prejudicial / discriminatory language?
  6. Can slight changes in language help change how macro social work practice is delivered?

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com.

About #MacroSW Media Nights:

Tune in for our once a month #MacroSW Media Night to talk about different social problems highlighted by the press. We’ll feature a video, podcast, blog post or article that features a hot topic. These chats are ideal for class assignment or extra credit opportunity.  For the chat schedule: https://macrosw.com/special-events/.

#MacroSW Chat – Nov. 10, 2016: It’s the Post-Election Detox / What’s On Your Mind / Fall & Winter Holidays are Coming OPEN MIC!

A swirling spiral of red and blue lines with people swept along it, leading to a ballot box.
Image: Stephen Savage for the NY Times

 

Here’s the archive of this chat.

Results are in; the winner of the US Presidential Election has been announced. The #MacroSW partners want to let everyone know that we will not assume we know how our colleagues / students / chat participants voted. #MacroSW chat will remain non-partisan in our role as the facilitator of these gloriously wide-ranging, informative, and stimulating chats. We plan on this chat being- as we hope all our chats are – trauma-informed.*  We do expect people to be expressing feelings and opinions, with comments made in a safe and respectful way in line with the Code of Ethics and the history of macro social work.** Host Pat Shelly from @UBSSW will be using the @officialmacrosw handle to further align in a neutral position.

Votes will be in and counted; the political ads will disappear.  How will you recover from this election season? Or do you want to talk about ANYTHING BUT the impact of the election?

Join us for this open mic:

  • What’s on your mind?
  • Regaining a sense of sanity after the 2016 U.S. elections.
  • Oh how those Thanksgiving and December holidays loom!!

Host: Pat Shelly @UBSSW University at Buffalo School of Social Work

We hope to have some fun, and offer ideas and resources for election season recovery! And – in case you are worried that your stress level will get too low –  we might talk about how to prepare for the November/December holidays and the often fraught family time they engender. The open mic means you can introduce whatever else is on your mind.
*6 Key Principles of a Trauma-Informed Approach:

  1. Safety;
  2. Trustworthiness and Transparency;
  3. Peer support;
  4. Collaboration and mutuality;
  5. Empowerment, voice and choice;
  6. Cultural, Historical, and Gender Issues

** “Macro social work practice includes those activities performed in organizational, community, and policy arenas. Macro practice has a diverse history that reveals conflicting ideologies and multiple theoretical perspectives (emphasis added).Programmatic, organizational, community, and policy dimensions of macro practice underscore the social work profession’s emphasis on using a person-in-environment perspective. Thus, social workers, regardless of roles played, are expected to have sensitivity toward and engage in macro practice activities.”

Netting. F.E. (2013). Macro Social Work Practice in Encyclopedia of Social Work 20th Edition. Retrieved from http://socialwork.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199975839.001.0001/acrefore-9780199975839-e-230


Resources:

To put things in perspective, here’s a satirical piece from the digital humor magazine The Onion:
ELECTION 2016: Nation Admits It’s Probably Going to Come Out of This Having Learned the Completely Wrong Lesson

And some bona fide research:

These elections are having an impact on the nation’s mental health:
Talking to Your Therapist About Election Anxiety : “‘I’ve been in private practice for 30 years, and I have never seen patients have such strong reactions to an election,’ said Sue Elias, a licensed clinical social worker in Manhattan.”

A report by the American Psychological Society shows that the 2016 elections were a source of  stress for 52% of Americans surveyed:
Stress in America: U.S. Presidential Election 2016