Conversation to Action

Christian Joudrey
Photo credit: Christian Joudrey via Unsplash

The shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile and the sniper attack on Dallas police is stirring racial tensions and left us saddened, grieving and questioning how we move forward to create more just and safe communities. We are loudly saying enough is enough across social media and in quiet conversations with friends, family and colleagues.  We’re tired of condolence statements and outraged by the little or no action by elected officials and leaders in our communities.

Social workers are uniquely equipped and want to constructively solve these challenging problems and create real solutions. After all, it’s in our DNA to act, advocate and heal, whether it’s through smarter gun control, access to mental health treatment or legislation, political participation and policy work. We will tackle inequities still prevalent, unacknowledged and exploited for political purposes. Many right now are fighting the good fight, and we’re ready to roll-up our sleeves to do more but how, when and where we can jump in is a big question for some of us.

Our #MacroSW group will direct our activities to engage our vast network of social workers who are ready to go beyond conversation to action and plug into current advocacy activities happening in communities.  We will be sharing on @OfficialMacroSW about events, letter writing campaigns, or policy initiatives that need our support and participation. Also you can:

  • Join and contribute to this Google document which will curate an ongoing list of events, activities, petitions, rally dates, etc. on a national and local level in which you can actively participate in to make a difference. This crowdsourcing effort will create a robust listing of places you can plug into and apply your social work expertise.
  • Got an idea for chat for us to discuss an advocacy effort? Contact us by direct message on @OfficialMacroSW, comment here or email kbfrazee@gmail.com or officialmacrosw@gmail.com to let us know so we can schedule time in our weekly chats and offer our platform to curate the best ideas and research to help your cause.
  • Post on the #MacroSW hashtag anytime to continue to collaborate and have conversations. Please share resources and ideas.
  • Check out the new public list, Stop the Violence, on @OfficialMacroSW that curates a collection of resources, organizations and individuals who are also taking action.
  • Two great reference lists have been developed to educate the public, social workers, and advocates as to why Black Lives Matter:  Understanding Systematic Oppression in the United States:  A Reference List for #BlackLivesMatter, and Race and Policing Research.

It will take all of us in big and small ways to change our country’s current path, and as social workers, we will do what we have always done, give people who can’t speak or act for themselves a voice.

July 14, 2016

 

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3 thoughts on “Conversation to Action

  1. I think the single most useful suggestion I’ve heard so far in terms of concrete actions we can take is to educate ourselves on what police training policies are working (Las Vegas is a great example, they have gone from one of the most to one of the least violent police forces in the country in the past five years through introducing new training and patrolling policies) and put pressure on our local police departments to make change in the right direction.

    It’s easy to say “stop police violence!” but someone more useful to say “institute X training program or Y community policing policy.” The department can’t say “this violence could not have been avoided” when you can demonstrate that the community has been asking them to increase community policing or change their training programs to those that are used by other departments, and they haven’t done so.

    Liked by 1 person

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