#MacroSW Media Night 6/30/16 – Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA

Click here for a copy of the chat transcript.

downloadFor our June Media Night, we will be watching Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA produced by Frontline.  Here is the description of the movie:

In Gunned Down: The Power of the NRA, FRONTLINE goes inside the politics of America’s gun debate. Veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk investigates the NRA, its political evolution and influence, and how it has consistently succeeded in defeating new gun control legislation.

Here is a link the movie (54 minutes): http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/gunned-down/.  You can watch the movie for free.  

Here are the questions we hope to discuss during the chat:

  1. From the movie, what are some of the special interests influencing the gun debate in America? #MacroSW
  2. How are current gun policies affecting your community? And the individuals & families who live in your community? #MacroSW
  3. How can we start talking about gun policies in America in more inclusive way; with less divisiveness? #MacroSW
  4. How do our professional ethics guide social workers in responding to the gun debate? #MacroSW
  5. What lessons about lobbying have you learned that can be applied to #MacroSW?
  6. What single word best describes how the film made you feel? #MacroSW
  7. What’s next? How do we as social workers promote practical solutions to the gun debates in America? #MacroSW

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

After Orlando / #PulseOrlando: #MacroSW Chat – Open Mic 06-23-16

In the wake of the Orlando shooting (we will use #PulseOrlando as our hashtag for this chat), we feel heartache, sadness and anger. We may be left wondering why this happened and how we can prevent future tragedies. The details of the shooting and the stories of survival and loss after #PulseOrlando reveal some of the most complex social problems of our era:  homophobia, racism, hate crimes and gun violence.

(Read the edited archive of this chat here)

 

image: kyliesoniquelove

 

Join us on Thursday, June 23 at 9 pm EST / 8 pm CT / 6 pm PT for an open mic chat to share thoughts, further our understanding and explore solutions for building a safer and more tolerant body politic.

 

 

 

 

The Orlando shooting  shows once again how  LGBTQ people are more likely to be a target of a hate crime; the intersections of race, gender and sexuality; the consequences of easy access to guns; internet influence on domestic terrorism; and the vilification of Islam in the US. Trauma-informed care will be of utmost importance and advocacy in this election year, spearheaded by macro practitioners and many others, will shape our national response to these issues. Our coordinated approach as a profession is crucial.

Some questions to guide the discussion:

  1. How has this event affected you and your community?
  2. How has being trained as a social worker prepared you to address the aftermath of Orlando?
  3. How do we best support those affected by trauma and violence in the aftermath of #PulseOrlando?
  4. How can we ensure we don’t spread secondary trauma?
  5. What is the role of social media in coping with events such as the Orlando shooting?
  6. How are you / your community practicing self-care?

Resources: (another resource list – an Orlando Syllabus for Social Workers – is posted below )

#PulseOrlandoSyllabus – Extensive resources crowdsourced and collected by librarians

Park, H. and Mykhyalyshyn, I. 2016 (June 16). L.G.B.T. People Are More Likely to Be Targets of Hate Crimes Than Any Other Minority Group. New York Times. Retrieved from: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/06/16/us/hate-crimes-against-lgbt.html?_r=1

Note: Many tweets about #PulseOrlando use “Latinx” instead of Latina/o. Why?
“The ‘x’ makes Latino, a masculine identifier, gender-neutral. It also moves beyond Latin@ – which has been used in the past to include both masculine and feminine identities – to encompass genders outside of that limiting man-woman binary.
Latinx, pronounced ‘La-teen-ex,’ includes the numerous people of Latin American descent whose gender identities fluctuate along different points of the spectrum, from agender or nonbinary to gender non-conforminggenderqueer and genderfluid.”
http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/our-issues/why-we-say-latinx-trans-gender-non-conforming-people-explain

  

pulse-orlando-header-672x372AN ORLANDO SYLLABUS FOR SOCIAL WORKERS

This post was created by Karen Zgoda, Pat Shelly, and Sheri LaBree, MSW – one of Karen’s former students. It is cross-posted to reach as many people as possible.

Here is a Macro Social Work version of an #OrlandoSyllbus. It can help us understand the facts and the complex layers of meaning of the June 12, 2016 massacre at the Pulse nightclub. It includes some implications for social work practice.

Please note the #PulseOrlandoSyllabus,  listed below,  is extensive. It includes current articles, in addition to less recent publications.

 

Intro by Sheri LaBree:

Much has been written in the media regarding the massacre that took place in Orlando on June 11th. Politicians, pundits and other talking heads have discussed the motives of the attacker, the morals of those that were injured or killed, and of course, they have talked about gun control.

What do we know, nearly two weeks later? Very little. We know that 49 individuals were murdered, and dozens were injured.

The attack occurred at a “gay nightclub.” To me, this label is misleading. Pulse, the nightclub where this occurred, was a sanctuary for the LGBTQ community. It was a safe place. Or at least it was supposed to be.

These people were more than “just” gay. They were sisters, brothers, cousins, coworkers, friends. Like all of us, their lives cannot be neatly divided into labels. The murdered include a social worker, an accountant, a dancer, and an aspiring nurse, among others.

Was this massacre a hate crime against the LGBTQ community? Was it the work of an Islamic terrorist? We may never know. Here’s the question: does it matter? These are people who faced discrimination and obstacles that most of us will never encounter, based solely on their sexual identity. Their lives should be celebrated. They should not be labeled, because they deserve so much more.

The importance of LGBTQ identity is a subject far too big to discuss here. My message is that we should remember the people who were murdered as whole people, with full lives that are multi-faceted and complex.

ORLANDO SYLLABUS FOR SOCIAL WORKERS Compiled by Karen Zgoda and Pat Shelly

Victims:

Syllabi:

General

  • On Orlando and Beyond. (2016).  Danna Bodenheimer. http://www.socialworker.com/feature-articles/real-world-clinical-sw/on-orlando-and-beyond/
    Excerpt:
    There isn’t much for me to say about Orlando that hasn’t already been said. Most of the debates about the underlying causes of this massacre have happened somewhere in the media or on Facebook. That said, it seems irresponsible and avoidant to write about anything else this week – because, the fact is, even with everything that has already been articulated, we need to keep talking. And talking and talking and talking. And while I have no overarching goal in talking about what happened in Orlando, there are a few points that I would like to make that feel particularly relevant to us as clinical social workers.

Hate Crimes

 


Latinx

 

( *6 Articles from #PulseOrlandoSyllabus with focus on LGBTQ, Trans, and people of color:)

Misogyny:

Queer Muslims

Social Work

Motivation

Impact on Children

 Gun Control Policy & Actions

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Racial Justice and Social Work Education 6/16/16

Chat archive and chat analytics now available!


All we say to America, is be true to what you say on paper.”

–Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

With those words in what would be his final speech, Dr. King sought to speak to the very conscience of America; to highlight the blatant disconnect between the kind environmental conditions America professed to provide for its citizens, and the markedly different experiences of Black people in America because of institutional racism.

The work to interrupt and end institutional racism continues today.  On campuses around the country, from The Black Bruins, to #BBUM, to the I Too, Am Harvard, Oxford, and Princeton campaigns, and with the activism that took place at The University of Mizzouri, Black students and other students of color are also demanding that their institutions to be true to what they say on paper and end structural and systemic racism on campus.

Social Workers play a crucial role in interrupting structural racism, yet, students of color even within schools of Social Work can have marginalizing experiences that reinforce the oppression they experience on a regular basis. Who helps the helpers? How can we interrupt systemic racism in Social Work Education, while preparing future practitioners for the field?

Join us for the #MacroSW chat on Thursday, June 16th at 9 pm EST (6 pm Pacific)  for a dialogue about Racial Justice and the state of Social Work Education.

For this week’s chat, watch: Concerned Student 1950 (32 minutes)

For this chat we’ll discuss the documentary and the following questions:

  1. How would you assess the state of Social Work Education in terms of racial justice?
  2. How was racism and the role of Social Work discussed/featured/ in your curriculum for your BSW/MSW/ Ph.D, etc? To what degree did you feel adequately prepared to address racism in the field upon graduation?
  3. What do you feel are high points of Social Work Education in terms of training students and practitioners to interrupt racism?
  4. What aspects are missing from the training/conversation/ curriculum that could improve cultural humility, responsiveness, and preparedness for Social Workers in regards to racial justice?
  5. How can schools of Social Work better support students of color?

Resources:

The Subtle Linguistics of Polite White Supremacy

Institutional Racism in The Social Work Profession: A Call To Action

Achieving Racial Equity: Calling The Social Work Profession to Action

NASW Statement on Racism

A Curriculum for White Americans To Educate Themselves on Race From Ferguson to Charleston

Campus Politics: A Cheat Sheet

3 Videos That Highlight The Absurdity of “All Lives Matter”

A Poem From Darius Simpson: Genocide

From PBS: There Was No Wave of Compassion When Addicts Were Hooked On Crack

I Too, Am BCC High School

From TED Med: Why Your Doctor Should Care About Social Justice

Jared Paul: 5 Times My Skin Color Did Not Kill Me

Are You Racist? No isn’t a good enough answer.

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

How Will We End Homelessness? #MacroSW Chat June 9

HomelessUpdate: Chat Transcript Available! 

Nearly 1.49 million people—approximately one in every 200 Americans—will experience homelessness for at least one night (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2013).  While there are policies, plans and research to support that we can end homelessness, there are still obstacles, both legislatively and people’s willingness to adapt approaches, in ameliorating this problem.

Ending homelessness, rather than just managing this, is a goal our government and other organizations hope to attain and also one of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW) Grand Challenges for Social Work.

Join us for the #MacroSW chat on Thursday, June 9 at 9 pm EST (6 pm Pacific) co-hosted with AASWSW for a conversation about ending homelessness.

Official GCSW_Logo

Social workers will play a pivotal role in addressing homelessness which has multiple complexities such as serious mental illness, addiction and poverty and impacts specific vulnerable populations including, but not limited to, veterans and youth.  Also, creating the right policies and laws will make a difference.

Last week, The Washington Post reported more cities are passing laws against camping, panhandling and public drinking as a way to push people who are homeless out of city centers while at the same time not offering affordable housing solutions and limited shelter options. This approach perpetuates a cycle of homelessness and hinders one’s ability to maintain employment. To fight back lawsuits have been filed on behalf of those who are homeless and unjustly prosecuted.

For this chat we’ll discuss the following questions.

  1. How are efforts to end homelessness connected to social work?
  2. What are the social, economic and other benefits of ending homelessness?
  3. How does homelessness affect families and children, both in the short- and long-term?
  4. What are some successful efforts to end homelessness that you can share?
  5. Where can I learn more about homelessness?

Resources

End Homelessness Paper, AASWSW Grand Challenges for Social Work

The Graying of America’s Homeless, New York Times

How Can We End Homelessness in the U.S.?, Atlantic

Sweeps Illustrate Inhuman Treatment of Homeless and Vulnerable (Huffington Post) (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nathan-woodliffstanley-/move-along-to-where-sweep_b_9432928.html)

National Coalition for the Homeless offers factsheets and publications.

Cities v. the Homeless, Washington Post

About #MacroSW:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held weekly on Twitter every Thursday at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST). Click here for a list of chat partners. For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: http://macrosw.com

Tracking Outcomes & Demonstrating Your Organization’s Social Impact: #MacroSW 6/2 at 9pm EST

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Some rights reserved by sinclair.sharon28

Update: Chat Transcript now available!

All organizations, for profit and nonprofit, are often asked to demonstrate their impact on the community. Tracking your organization outcomes and social impact is critical for continued growth and success. Tracking social and community related outcomes can be difficult, but it is not impossible. Join us on 6/2/2016 at 9pm for the #MacroSW chat on “Tracking Outcomes & Demonstrating Your Organization’s Social Impact.” The chat is led by Side Project CEO & #MacroSW chat partner Jeff Fromknecht, MSW who has more than 10 years of experience evaluating social programs.

Chat questions:

  1. What is program evaluation?
  2. Why is evaluation important?
  3. What are the different types of evaluation?
  4. What is a logic model?
  5. How do you share your organization’s outcomes with stakeholders?
  6. What are some evaluation resources that you use?