Student Documentary Movie Night 2/25/16 – Inequality for All

Inequalityforall

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a link to the transcript from this chat on Storify: https://storify.com/laurelhitchcock/student-documentary-movie-night-2-25-16-inequality/preview.

Social work students (and everyone else) from across the country are welcome to participate in a student-focused chat about income equality.  Join us for a live, interactive event in which social work professors Jimmy Young, of the California State University San Marcos, and Laurel Hitchcock, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, will facilitate a live discussion about the documentary film Inequality for All on Thursday, February 25th at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to connect with social work students, educators and practitioners from around the world. To participate:

  1. Watch the documentary Inequality for All. See below for information on how to access the movie.
  2. Your instructor may ask you to write a brief statement about your reaction to the movie.
  3. Participate in the live Twitter chat using the hashtag #MacroSW. Tweet any questions or responses directed to the moderators and social work professors Jimmy Young (@JimmySW) and Laurel Hitchcock (@laurelhitchcock). Include #MacroSW in all of your tweets.
  4. Following the live chat, your instructor may also ask you to write a brief self-reflection essay about your experience of participating in this event.

The written parts of the assignment are optional and are not required to participate. However, we do encourage you to take some time to reflect upon what you learn from the film and the topics that are discussed in the chat. How might they inform your future social work practice?

To Access the Film:

The film is available for streaming from iTunes and Amazon Prime. You can still request the DVD from Netflix.

Alternatively, you can watch this interview between Bill Moyers and Robert Reich discussing the film:

About the Film: Directed by Jacob Kornbluth, Inequality for All is a 2013 documentary film that examines the widening income gap in the United States. Using the stories of real people and real lives, the narrative explores the effects this increasing gap has not only on the U.S. economy but also on democracy itself. Presented by American economist, author and professor Robert Reich, the film premiered at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival and won a U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Achievement in Filmmaking.

Questions for the live chat:

  1. What is happening today in terms of distribution of wealth? Why is it happening? What do you see happening and what are the causes?
  2. When do you think inequality becomes a problem?
  3. If the government sets the rules for how the market functions, who do these rules benefit or hurt?
  4. Who is looking out for the American worker? Who do you think should be and what could be done?
  5. After watching the film, do you agree/disagree with the idea of equal opportunity and the American Dream?
  6. What do you think most Americans don’t realize about income Inequality?
  7. What single word best describes how the film made you feel?
  8. What’s next? How do we as social workers address inequality or move forward?

If you are an educator wanting to incorporate this chat as an assignment in your class, please click here for details.  We hope you can join us! Please contact Jimmy or Laurel if you plan to have your class or maybe student groups participate in the chat.  They will also welcome your questions.

ACEs & Trauma-Informed Systems: Building Practices & Policies to Avoid Re-traumatization – Feb. 18, 2016

Hands cupping hands

Update: Chat archive now available!
And see the article based on this chat published in The New Social Worker:  Preventing Retraumatization: A Macro Social Work Approach to Trauma-Informed Practices and Policies by Karen Zgoda, Pat Shelly, Shelley Hitzel

Smyth, N.J. (2015). Trauma-Informed Social Work: What is it, and Why Should We Care? [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/njsmyth/toronto-tic-june-2015-handout
Image: Smyth, N.J. (2015). Trauma-Informed Social Work: What is it, and Why Should We Care? [PowerPoint slides]. 
All social workers and other professionals who work with people who have experienced trauma are at risk of being personally impacted by that trauma. Secondary traumatic stress (STS), vicarious trauma (VT) and re-traumatization are common among helping professionals. When we hear the term trauma-informed care we typically think about how to avoid re-traumatizing our clients.

But what about considering a trauma-informed approach to the systems in which we work?

On February 18, 2016, the #MacroSW chat will discuss systems-level change to avoid re-traumatizing not only our clients but ourselves as social workers, as staff and as nonprofit entities. Through our understanding of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), we know that adult health can be negatively impacted by traumatic experiences in the early years. ACEs also affect our thoughts, behaviors, actions and reactions as individuals, as employees and as leaders. Can we start to address ACEs with system-wide policies and practices that may minimize that impact in later years? A trauma-informed workplace can help not only our clients but our staff in minimizing re-traumatization.

Pat Shelly of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work @UBSSW will host with guest Shelley Hitzel @UBittic.

Shelley Hitzel, Univ. at Buffalo Institute for Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care Intern
Shelley Hitzel, Univ. at Buffalo Institute for Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care Intern

Since 2010, Shelley has worked at the Child Advocacy Center of Niagara in Niagara Falls, NY, as a member of a multidisciplinary team providing direct services to both child and adult survivors of trauma.  Shelley completed UB’s Trauma Counseling Certificate Program in 2012. Currently, she is an Advanced Standing MSW student and an intern at the UB Institute on Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care. She has participated in aome of our past chats, representing ITTIC.

Questions for discussion:

 

  1. What is Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS)?   What is Vicarious Trauma?
  2. What is re-traumatization?
  3. How can systems be considered to be traumatized or traumatizing?
  4. How can we build systems to prevent re-traumatization across all levels?
  5. Policy – What is TIC policy?

 

For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs.

Resources:

About Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care:
http://socialwork.buffalo.edu/social-research/institutes-centers/institute-on-trauma-and-trauma-informed-care/about-us/trauma-and-trauma-informed-care.html

SAMHSA: Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach
http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA14-4884/SMA14-4884.pdf

Bringing Team Care Strategies and Resilience to Your Agency Staff
(permission to share this PowerPoint presentation was granted by the authors )
http://victimsofcrime.org/docs/nat-conf-2013/final-bringing-team-care-strategies-and-resilience-2013-(1).pdf?sfvrsn=2

Sandra Bloom: Trauma Organized Systems and Parallel Process
http://www.sanctuaryweb.com/Portals/0/Bloom%20Pubs/2011%20Bloom%20Trauma-organized%20systems%20and%20parallel%20process.pdf

Community Connections: Creating Cultures of Trauma Informed Care http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/icmh/documents/CCTICSelf-AssessmentandPlanningProtocol0709.pdf

 

 

 

Let’s Chat on 2/11 About Leveraging Technology for Social Good

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Update: Chat archive now available!

Technology has undoubtedly transformed our personal and professional lives and changed a great deal over the years. We depend on our cell phones for so many things from driving directions to staying connected to everyone in our lives. Social workers too are using technology and this has shaped our practice and helped us solve social problems. In many ways, technology has made our work easier but still poses its fair share of challenges.

Join us on Thursday, February 11 at 9 pm EST (6 pm Pacific) for the #MacroSW chat for a conversation about leveraging technology for social good.  This chat is inspired by the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare’s Grand Challenges.  We’ll have some special guests tweeting with us.

  • Jonathan Singer (@socworkpodcast), PhD., LCSW, Host and Founder of The Social Work Podcast and Associate Professor at Loyola University Chicago and co-author of the Grand Challenge paper, Practice Innovation through Technology.
  • Representative from AASWSW (@AASWSWorg)
  • SageSurfer (@sagesurfer), a technology company which offers web-based solutions for providers to better coordinate care for consumers.

We’ll explore the following questions.

  • How are you using technology in your everyday social work practice?
  • What are some examples of how technology has been utilized in advocacy and fundraising?
  • How has technology impacted access to services and treatment?
  • What are some of the barriers to using technology in social work practice?

For information about how to participate in the #MacroSW chat, view our FAQs.

Resources

AASWSW Website Harnessing Technology for Social Good

Google + community Social Work and Technology

Social work practice crossroad: Technological advances have pros, cons, NASW News 2016

NASW & ASWB Standards for Technology and Social Work Practice, 2005, to be updated in 2016.

Social Work Tech

Human Services Information Technology applications (husITa)

Grand Accomplishments in #SocialWork: #MacroSW Chat 2/4 at 9pm EST

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Some rights reserved by Hey Paul Studios

Update: Chat archive now available!

According to lead author Michael Sherraden at Washington University of St. LouisGrand Accomplishments in Social Work describes a number of achievements during the last century including protection and deinstitutionalization of dependent children, the expansion of foster care and adoption, reductions in infant mortality, end of child labor, expansion of civil and women’s rights and many others. Were you aware that social work pioneer Jane Addams won the Nobel Peace Prize, the second woman to receive this prize? Samuel L. Jackson, Alice Walker, and Suze Orman all have social work degrees. Social worker and current Senator Barbara Mikulski has also been the longest serving woman Senator in U.S. history. During World War II, social worker Irena Sendler rescued 2,500 Jewish children in Poland as part of underground organization Żegota. Public health worker, social worker, and whistleblower Peter Buxton helped stop the unethical Tuskegee Study.

Join us as we discuss some of these grand accomplishments of social work practice. Here are some questions we will address:

  1. What do you think the field’s biggest accomplishments have been?
  2. Where is social work on its way to big things/big accomplishments?
  3. In what ways have Social Work’s Grand Accomplishments affirmed your commitment to social work practice and research?
  4. Which of the Grand Challenges do you think we have the best chance of turning in Grand Accomplishments in the next decade?
  5. What evolving skill set are you developing that will be needed  to sustain our profession’s future work?

Additional Sources: