Macro Social Work Practice Ethics: #MacroSW Twitter Chat 11/19 at 9pm EST

hamccabe

Update 11/19/15: Chat archive now available!

Social workers are often asked to consider the ethics of working with their clients in a therapeutic relationship. Here we will discuss the implications of ethics working along the full continuum of social work – from micro to macro. Most have heard about ethical issues like Confidentiality, Dual Relationships, and Sexual Relationships. How do ethics look when working with communities? What ethical obligations do social workers have to work for social justice when working one on one with clients?

We will explore how practitioners and students view ethical obligations around macro practice and social justice issues. Our guest expert is Heather McCabeAssistant Professor of Social Work at Indiana University.  She served as a medical social worker at a pediatric tertiary care hospital for several years before returning to school for her law degree.  She also served as the Director of the Public Health Law Program  and then Executive Director for the Hall Center for Law and Health at the IU School of Law – Indianapolis before coming to her current position.  Professor McCabe’s research is primarily in the areas of public health, health policy, health disparities, health reform, and disability related policy.  She is particularly interested in exploring the effects of multidisciplinary education and collaboration in her work.

Questions to be explored:

  1. Do you think about the NASW Code of Ethics applying to community organizing, policy practice, advocacy? If so, how?
  2. If you see multiple clients with the same systemic issue, do you have any ethical obligation to address the issue?
  3. What types of bills do you see as impacting your clients? What responsibility to you have to advocate for/educate about them?
  4. Do you advocate for policy in your day to day work? Give an example.
  5. How do we continue encouraging social workers to see practice as a continuum, which includes macro practice?

Resources:

  • Reisch, M. & Lowe, J.I. (2000). “Of means and ends” revisited: Teaching ethical community organizing in an unethical society. Journal of Community Practice, 7(1), 19-38.
  • Hardina, D. (2000). Guidelines for ethical practice in community organization. Social Work, 49(4), 595-604.
  • Harrington, D., & Dolgoff, R. (2008). Hierarchies of Ethical Principles for Ethical Decision Making in Social Work. Ethics and Social Welfare, 2(2), 183–196. doi:10.1080/17496530802117680
  • National Association of Social Workers. (2008).  Code of ethics of the National Association of Social Workers. Washington, DC: NASW Press.
  • Rome, S.H.,Hoechstetter, S., and Wolf-Branigin, M. (2010). Pushing the envelope: Empowering clients through political action. Journal of Policy Practice, 9(3-4), 201-219.
  • Rome, S.H. (2009). Value inventory for policy advocacy. In E.P Congress, P.N. Black, and K. Strom-Gottfried (Eds.) Teaching Social Work Values and Ethics. Alexandria, VA: Council on Social Work Education.

About us:

#MacroSW is a collaboration of social workers, organizations, social work schools, and individuals working to promote macro social work practice. Macro social work practice focuses on changing larger systems, such as communities and organizations. It encompasses a broad spectrum of actions and ideas, ranging from community organizing and education to legislative advocacy and policy analysis. The chats are held bimonthly on Twitter on the second and fourth Thursday of each month at 9 p.m. EST (6 p.m. PST).

For information about how to participate in the MacroSW chat, view our FAQs. For chat schedule and chat archives check out: https://macrosw.wordpress.com.

#MacroSW Chat November 12: A Social Entrepreneurial Approach to Supporting Veterans

Flag_image

Here is the link for this chat’s transcript. Here are chat analytics.

Join us for #MacroSW Twitter chat, A Social Entrepreneurial Approach to Supporting Veterans, on Thursday, November 12 at 9 pm EST (6 pm Pacific) with guests from MTI Integrated Business Development, Inc. (@MTIIBD), Wendell J. Knight, LMSW, CSWM, Chief Executive Officer and Noel Dunn, Veteran and Veteran’s Greenhouse Manager.

Veterans and service members face many challenges ranging from mental health and substance use disorders to unemployment and readjustment to civilian life after service. Now more than ever we need to look for solutions that can have the greatest impact in our work with veterans and many other populations. Social entrepreneurship has emerged in recent decades as a self-sustaining approach to addressing social problems. This mix of profitable enterprise and an entity that can enact social change has shown promise. Social workers have the skills and can be at the forefront of creating social enterprises to positively impact our communities.

On this chat we will feature MTI Integrated Business Development, Inc. as an example of how social entrepreneurship is meeting the needs of veterans, specifically around employment and work readiness. We’ll also discuss veterans’ unique needs and explore how social workers can apply social entrepreneurship in our work.

About MTI Integrated Business Development, Inc.

MTI Integrated Business Development, Inc. (MTI IBD) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 2010 which creates employment opportunities for veterans. MTI blends the practices of entrepreneurship and social work to achieve social impact. Specifically, MTI scales social purpose businesses in ways that simultaneously strengthen the social services offered to veterans. Learn more at http://www.mtinj.org/.

Here are questions to be explored:

  1. What does MTI Integrated Business Development, Inc. do and how was this organization started?
  2. How has MTI Integrated Business Development, Inc. a social entrepreneurial approach been successful in helping veterans?
  3. What are some of the greatest challenges in serving veterans and doing good while sustaining profitable businesses?
  4. Let’s discuss some of the biggest challenges/successes for veterans and how we as social workers can support them in our community.
  5. What can social workers do to apply a social entrepreneurial approach to solving big community problems?

For information about how to participate in the MacroSW chat, view our FAQS

Resources:

SAMHSA, Veterans and Families, last update Sept. 9, 2014
Serving Veterans: A Resource Guide, SAMHSA, 2015
Finding a Job Biggest Challenge for Veterans, Survey Finds, Washington Post, August 19, 2012
A Tool Kit for Developing a Social Purpose Business Plan, Seedco, 2004
Social Entrepreneurship, Coursera Online Course, Wharton University of Pennsylvania School
The Rise of Social Entrepreneurship Suggests a Possible Future for Global Capitalism, Forbes, May 2, 2013
Community Wealth Partners, A Share Our Strength Organization
Sanford Social Entrepreneurship Hub
Two Keys to Sustainable Social Enterprise, Harvard Business Review, May 2015

Macro Matters: 20% by 2020

By Rachel L. West
ACOSA Board Member

Update: Chat transcript can be found here.

The Special Commission to Advance Macro Practice in Social Work is calling on the CSWE and other social work organizations to make a commitment to macro practice. Current data shows only 9-10% of social work students plan to pursue macro practice. The commission wants to raise that number to 20% by 2020.

As Michael Reisch pointed out in his eloquent essay, macro is an important component of social work practice.

It pushes the boundaries of the profession by fostering a “big picture” perspective that enables social workers and society as a whole to analyze people’s issues “outside the box” and focus on the prevention of problems, not merely their amelioration. Macro practice explicitly embodies social work’s commitment to social justice and social change by promoting structural solutions to systemic inequalities and various forms of oppression that go beyond individual adaptation and resilience.

The Rothman report brought to light serious concerns that if not dealt with endanger the future of macro practice.

On Thursday November 5th #MacroSW Twitter Chats will discuss the work of The Special Commission to Advance Macro Practice in Social Work and the 20% by 2020 initiative. The chat starts at 9:00 PM EST. I will host the chat from @acosaorg account.

Before the chat please read the following:

The Special Commission to Advance Macro Social Work Practice

Why Macro Practice Matters
By Michael Reisch, University of Maryland

NOW! MAKE MACRO MATTER: Taking Further Action to Address the Macro Imbalance in Social Work Education

 Our partners include:

  • Association for Community Organizing and Social Administration (ACOSA), @acosaorg
  • Karen Zgoda, MSW, LCSW, Instructor of Social Work at Bridgewater State University, @karenzgoda
  • Rachel West, The Political Social Worker, @poliSW
  • University at Buffalo School of Social Work, @ubssw
  • Sunya Folayan, MSW, ACSW, founder/executive director, The Empowerment Project, Inc., @SunyaFolayan
  • Laurel Hitchcock, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Alabama at Birmingham,@Laurelhitchcock
  • Kristin Battista-Frazee, MSW, Author and Marketing Consultant, @porndaughter

In addition to the active partners above, founding chat partners include: